A woman suffering from Covid-19 has become the first in Wales to be given the same treatment as Donald Trump.

Melanie James, from Cardiff, received a transfusion of monoclonal antibodies after being admitted to the University Hospital Llandough near Penarth.

The same experimental treatment was given to Trump when he was hospitalised in Washington earlier this month, Wales Online reported.

The US President was released a few days later.

Mrs James received the transfusion as part of the Randomised Evaluation of Covid-19 Therapy (Recovery) clinical trial.

She is now recovering at home.

She received the treatment at Llandough University hospital

Mrs James said she was breathless and receiving oxygen at the point when she received the transfusion, but then her symptoms started to improve.

“There was never any doubt in my mind about taking part in this research trial,” she said.

“I felt very poorly and had deteriorated very quickly, and I wanted to get better and to help other people to get better.

"We’re in the dark about Covid-19 and I wanted to give something back."

Mrs James praised the care she received and how thoroughly informed she had been prior to the treatment being started.

Donald Trump was also infused with antibody therapy
Donald Trump was also infused with antibody therapy

"Everyone was so caring and kind so it made me feel really pleased to take part in the research," she continued.

“I started to feel better the day after the transfusion, and I only had a small amount of oxygen during that night.

"Although I’m still recovering, I already feel much better than I did a week ago.”

The aim of the trial, which is the world’s largest randomised controlled clinical trial in the battle against coronavirus, is to discover the effectiveness of monoclonal antibodies.

Scientists hope they can prevent Covid-19 from entering humans cells in a bid to stop them becoming seriously ill.

Cardiff and Vale University Health Board has played a significant part in the trial and since March it has recruited 210 patients to it.

Dr Stuart Walker, executive medical director of Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, said: “Our research teams have made an outstanding contribution throughout the Covid-19 pandemic, and I would like to commend their efforts in implementing this trial so proactively.

“We are watching the ongoing global research into Covid-19 with great interest, in the hope that we are able to act upon further positive developments in the coming months.

“In the meantime, I would once again urge members of the public to play their part in controlling Covid-19 infection rates by following government guidance, and ensuring that they continue to wash their hands regularly for at least 20 seconds, wear a face mask in all indoor public spaces, and keep a two metre distance from others.”