Rebecca Long-Bailey has recommitted herself to Labour's pledge to scrap Universal Credit- saying she "will not compromise" on axing the six-in-one benefit.

The left-wing leadership hopeful repeated Jeremy Corbyn's policy of ditching the Tory reform after years of complaints and delays, and replacing it with a new system.

All three leading candidates for Labour leader - Rebecca Long-Bailey, Keir Starmer and Lisa Nandy - have now said they would scrap Universal Credit, a policy that was in Labour's 2019 manifesto.

Ms Long-Bailey demanded her rivals make the same pledge as her with a jibe at their voting records.

She pointed out that she "voted against the Conservatives' destructive welfare reforms in 2015". Commons records suggest she opposed the second reading of the Tories' Welfare Reform and Work Bill while Keir Starmer and Emily Thornberry did not vote in a July 2015 vote. The Labour whip was to abstain, a controversy at the time.

A spokesman for Sir Keir Starmer said he too would scrap Universal Credit.

Lisa Nandy - who has already also committed to scrap Universal Credit - was on maternity leave at the time of the 2015 vote. A local Momentum branch was accused of smearing her last week when it wrongly claimed she abstained.

Lisa Nandy - who has already also committed to scrap Universal Credit - was on maternity leave at the time of the 2015 vote

Speaking after a BBC2 documentary showed heartbreaking stories behind the system, and after its rollout was delayed yet again to 2024, she said: "Tinkering around the edges of a fundamentally cruel and broken system simply isn’t good enough. It is beyond repair.

"I voted against the Conservatives’ destructive welfare reforms in 2015. Never again can Labour stand idly by while the Tories tear apart the social fabric of our country.

“The next Labour leader must not compromise our principles on Universal Credit. If elected leader I will take the fight to the Tories over their failed and deeply unpopular programme and in government we will scrap it for good.

“As leader I would end benefit sanctions and establish a review with campaigners, policy experts, MPs and trade unions into a fair, just and dignified social security system to replace it, which would end poverty and be ready implement the day we go into government.”

A spokesman for Sir Keir Starmer said he too would scrap Universal Credit

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It comes a day after her rival Lisa Nandy also called for Universal Credit to be scrapped.

Ms Nandy said the system could be replaced with "participatory workshops" including "trained members" to develop a new system.

She said: "Universal Credit should be scrapped and rebuilt with the people it should be supporting.

“Universal Credit is a failure yet the Tories can't bring themselves to admit that they are part of the problem. It is time for a different approach which allows the people who rely on the state for help, with the expertise of advocacy groups, to change it for the better."

Rebecca Long-Bailey, Keir Starmer and Lisa Nandy are all set to face a ballot of Labour members from mid-February. Emily Thornberry is also in the race, but appears to be struggling to get enough nominations from local parties or unions to make the ballot.