Summer schools should be set up to help pupils catch up on the work they have missed during the coronavirus lockdown, according to the children’s commissioner.

Anne Longfield said the most vulnerable children were at risk of falling behind as a result of spending up to six months at home.

She called for a “national effort” to set up camps providing sport, art and education throughout July and August.

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“Based in school buildings and running throughout the holidays, summer schools could provide activities of all kinds, meals and potentially some learning too,” Ms Longfield said in an article for the Daily Telegraph.

“The idea is likely to be popular with parents, who, however well-intentioned and motivated, may need a break from home schooling.”

Ministers are also said to be considering providing extra funding to support disadvantaged children.

However, teaching unions have expressed concerns about making staff provide education to children during the summer holidays.

Dr Mary Bousted, general secretary of the National Education Union, told Sky’s Sophy Ridge on Sunday that “teachers have been working flat out to provide education for children at home”.

Instead, summer schools should be offered on a volunteer basis to offer activities and opportunities to socialise with other children, she said.

Primary schools are due to reopen on Monday for reception, Year One and Year Six classes, while secondary schools will begin reopening on 15 June.

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