Sixteen people have been arrested on suspicion of drugs offences - from heroin to cannabis - in Newland Avenue in the past two months alone.

Humberside Police have said they are tackling the "vibrant, bustling part of Hull" that has sadly been used by criminals as their "playground" - despite being a strong residential and business community.

The force say that they are working hard to tackle Newland Avenue residents’ priority issues, which have been highlighted graffiti, begging and drug activity.

Police say that the drug arrests have all come from stop and searches in the area whilst out patrolling. The say a further two people were arrested on suspicion of producing cannabis, after a warrant found 200 cannabis plants across two properties.

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16 people have been arrested on suspicion of drug crimes in the area

In terms of graffiti, the force say four people have been arrested and dealt with for criminal damage as they attempt to root out those who are destroying the beauty of the area. They encouraged anyone who witnesses graffiti taggers in action to call police on 101 as the crime often goes unreported but can have a huge impact on the community.

Another issue tackled by Humberside Police in the area is that of street drinking and begging.

They say that in the first instance police will engage with those involved and try to understand more about their situation, but are aware that "not all beggars are homeless and instead try and exploit local people to fund their habits".

Speaking more about covering neighbourhood policing in Newland Avenue, PC Wayne Mellors said: "A total of 16 people have been arrested on suspicion of possession of drugs, or possession with intent to supply drugs, from cannabis to heroin in the last two months.

“We continue working closely with the local authority and Newland Residents Association in relation to graffiti that has been popping up across the area. So far, four people have been arrested and dealt with for criminal damage, two specifically on this ward.

“We are progressing several further investigations to continue rooting out those who are destroying the beauty of the area, and I would encourage anyone who witnesses graffiti taggers in action to call us, so that we can take appropriate action. Graffiti often goes unreported, but can have a huge impact on the community, which is why I would urge people to get in touch with us.

“Another issue we work to robustly tackle is street drinking and begging. Newland Avenue is subject to a Public Space Protection Order, meaning those who are drinking on the street and acting in an anti-social manner can expect to be challenged by officers and have their alcohol seized.

“We have worked with our licensing department previously to ensure license holders and shops are not serving people who are too drunk and behaving inappropriately. Understandably as the Covid restrictions ease, we will continue to monitor this and work with premises to ensure people are able to enjoy themselves, but are being safe, sensible and considerate of others at the same time.

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“With those begging on the streets, we in the first instance try to engage with them and understand more about their situation. Where people have unfortunately found themselves homeless and are struggling to get out of that situation, we work with partners such as Emmaus and the local authority to help and support them in any way we can, and are pleased to say that many of these people now have their own accommodation and are doing well in life.

“However, not all beggars are homeless and instead try and exploit local people to fund their habits. It is possible for these people to be charged with begging offences, which has been the case for one man earlier this year who was persistently causing issues. A Community Behaviour Order is now in place to prevent him from coming back into the area for any reason.

“A further three people are also subject to Community Protection Notices in relation to this activity and I am pleased to say, they have not breached these orders.

“Again, I would urge the community to report these offences to us so that we can investigate. Whilst these people may not necessary be violent or aggressive, their behaviour can make people feel anxious and unsafe, which we can’t tolerate."