Boris Johnson plans to reduce access to the legal system for refugees, making it easier for the Home Office to deport them.

As many as half of immigration and asylum decisions are overturned when challenged in court.

But in today’s Queen’s Speech Boris Johnson set out plans to remove this barrier by overturning a decade of legal precedent and remove the right to have a High Court judge review their case.

The Government’s briefing document, issued alongside the Queen’s Speech, claims there are as many as 700 so-called “Cart” challenges every year.

Without addressing whether the challenges are legally valid, the Government has decided to overturn the precedent.

The document says: “We are investigating how many of these cases result in a successful outcome for the claimant.”

Boris Johnson and Priti Patel want to make the system of deporting refugees "more efficient"
Boris Johnson and Priti Patel want to make the system of deporting refugees "more efficient"

Government figures show 52 per cent of immigration and asylum appeals were allowed in the year to March 2019, with 23,514 people seeing their refusals overturned.

The Prime Minister's Official Spokesman said: "We want to reverse that because it will increase the efficiency of the court and the tribunal system - and clarify the status and decisions of the upper tribunal.

"An additional effect will very likely be to reduce delays in the immigration and asylum system."

Asked if the government wanted to reduce access to the legal system in order to deport them more quickly, he said: "No, I think we want fair access to the legal system for all, but it's also right that we take action to clarify whether there is any issues that need reviewing and make sure we're running an efficient system."

The Queen's Speech also included a pledge that "measures will be brought forward to establish a fairer immigration system that strengthens the United Kingdom's borders and deters criminals who facilitate dangerous and illegal journeys."