The UK has been issued with four days worth of weather warnings with the possibility of a 'bomb cyclone' heading to our shores.

The warnings follow the devastation Storm Ciara and Dennis have caused over the past two weeks.

Merseyside has been issued two yellow weather warning for rain by the Met Office.

According to forecasters, the first band of heavy rain is set to hit Merseyside between 12pm today (February 21) and 6am on Saturday February 22.

There are no weather warnings for Merseyside on Sunday.

The second warning for the region has been issued between 3am on Monday February 24 finishing at 3pm.

Forecasters at the Met Office said : "Further rain is expected across northern England on Friday.

"Rain will turn persistent and occasionally heavy over parts of the Pennines before clearing early on Saturday. 20-30 mm is likely to fall widely over higher ground with the potential for 50-70 mm in a few places.

Brollies at the ready as the weather turns to heavy rain in Liverpool.

"Given the recent wet conditions this brings a risk of flooding.

"A spell of rain is then expected to push quickly from south-west to north-east through Monday, clearing all areas through Monday afternoon.

"Most areas are likely to see a further 15-25 mm of rain, with some higher ground perhaps seeing up to 40 mm of rain.

"Given saturated ground, and recent flooding, even these relatively modest rainfall totals may bring some disruption."

Read More

Top news stories

According to Somerset Live, there is a possibility of extreme weather sweeping in from an off-shore “bomb cyclone.”

Severe Weather Europe said: “A rapidly developing extra-tropical cyclone is looking more impressive on the satellite, gradually developing hurricane-force winds around its core.

“With the pressure drop of around 35 mbar during the past 24 hours, the system is classified as a ‘bomb cyclone’.

“Its future impact remains on track with the previous discussion, it will push violent windstorm between Iceland and Faroes, but also severe to extremely severe winds over broader area.”