An Instagram influencer who made claims that the 'bump' at the bottom of a woman's stomach is their womb has been called out by an NHS doctor for being "medically inaccurate".

Influencer and nutritionist blogger @no.food.rules -whose real name is Colleen, posted a picture of herself holding a sign that says: "FYI that bump at the bottom of your stomach is your uterus."

Alongside the picture, she added: "Hands up if this just blew your mind!

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"A girlfriend posted this in the SociEATy recently and I realized that there is SO many people who don’t realize this!

"Our stomachs? They shouldn’t necessarily be flat! That’s your uterus (and fat and other organs obvi like intentioned, stomach, etc., let’s not get too into anatomy here. Simply saying our tummies and pelvis house V important things) down there!"

She went on to say that she had struggled with "staring in the mirror" feeling "frustrated" that her stomach wasn't flat in the past.

"What was that bump and why wouldn’t it go in?! Welp, the answer is part of that bumps is organs. And we need those. So, that bump? It SHOULD be there and it isn’t wrong."

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While some loved the post, others, including one NHS doctor, blasted the claims as "medically accurate".

Dr Joshua Wolrich, an  NHS  surgical doctor, commented on the post, saying: "Fat is 100 percent normal, but saying the bump is your uterus just simply isn’t medically accurate."

One person replied: "Weird, I had a hysterectomy last year, still got a 'bump', maybe it’s something else guys."

Another said: "I mean internal organs do take up space in your body... But like... How about we just be ok with the weight our bodies carry."

A similar incident  occurred last year  after a tweet about the 'bump' being a uterus also went viral.

In response, Dr Sarah Jarvis, GP and clinical director of  Patient.info   explained what the "bump" actually is.