Disney is known for bringing magic to life in everything it does, from its movies to the various theme parks located around the world.

But while fans are dazzled by elaborate parades, live shows and thrill-seeking rides, the geniuses at Disney also put a lot of thought into the bits they don't want you to see.

If you've visited a Disney theme park, you may not have noticed (as that's the point) that everything considered not to add magic to the experience is painted in the same shade of green.

Doors not accessible to the public, structures like lighting rigs, and even entire buildings are covered in a paint colour Disney developed itself, which it calls 'Go Away Green'.

The Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland Paris
Posts and bins are painted in Go Away Green to ensure guests focus on the important stuff
A speaker pole painted in Go Away Green
It aims to hide unsightly objects in the background

Working on the same logic as camouflage, the muted shade of green aims to draw as little attention as possible, encouraging visitors to look past it and focus on the things Disney wants you to see instead.

It was discussed by the hosts of the Life's A Party podcast in a clip shared to TikTok, as Ryan Smith said: "I saw where they paint doors a certain shade of green. Apparently us humans, we don't recognise that shade of green and we don't even recognise the door being there."

Fellow host Paul McGroarty then says: "So that's called Go Away Green. Go Away Green is a paint colour that Disney uses when they want to hide things."

A door painted in 'Go Away Green'
Doors and even entire buildings are painting in 'Go Away Green'

Fans have also said there is a second paint colour named 'No See Um Grey' used for the same purpose.

The short clip racked up a staggering 11.6 million views and more than 4,000 comments as one person added: "It's just a colour your eyes gloss over so it's not like we can't perceive it, it's just to hide back stage stuff from your attention."

A second wrote: "The documentary I watched said that the shade of green was found to be least appealing to people so they put in on things they wanted people to keep away [from]."

But another said: "I hate that colour, I always thought it looked out of place at the park."