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United Kingdom

Voters want No Deal Brexit or no Brexit AT ALL says new poll showing public is very divided

The  British public is increasingly polarised after months of Brexit chaos and is split between those wanting to leave without a deal and those who want to stay in the EU, a new poll shows.

Voters on both sides of the Brexit divide have lost their appetite for another delay to the decision on whether to quit and whether to revoke the Article 50 process and stay within the trade block, it suggests.

Analysis of four clusters of swing seats in the UK by Hanbury for the website Politico shows a majority in favour of a No Deal Brexit in the North West and East Midlands.

By contrast, Scotland and London both have majority support for revoking and remaining in the EU.

Support for a further delay to Brexit past October 31 did not pass nine per cent in any of the four areas in the poll of more than 3,000 people.

Boris Johnson, pictured in Westminster today, could face an immediate crisis if and when he becomes PM next Wednesday

Almost half of voters backed a delay to Brexit in February. But they do not seem to want a long delay, with support dropping off dramatically as the suggested length of the postponement increases

This compared with 47 per cent  nationwide support for an extension to Article 50 in a February poll by the same organisations.

It came as it was reported Boris Johnson will transform the Department for Exiting the European Union into a 'Ministry of No Deal' to show the EU he is serious about meeting the October 31 deadline. 

The favourite to be the next prime minister is will reportedly strip DExEU of all other tasks and tell civil servants there to focus all of their attention on preparing for a disorderly divorce.

Meanwhile, the former foreign secretary is facing growing pressure from Tory Eurosceptics to make Iain Duncan Smith, the former party leader, his deputy PM. 

Members of the European Research Group of Tory Brexiteers believe the veteran Eurosceptic would act as a guard against Mr Johnson watering down his pledges. 

Mr Johnson is widely expected to beat his Tory leadership rival Jeremy Hunt and take over from Theresa May in Downing Street next Wednesday. 

He has promised to take Britain out of the EU by Halloween 'do or die' and with or without a deal.

Philip Hammond, pictured yesterday at a G7 meeting in Paris, France, is also expected to quit in order to deny Mr Johnson the chance to sack him

Rory Stewart, the former Tory leadership challenger, is expected to join Mr Gauke and Mr Hammond in quitting while reports suggest at least a dozen junior ministers could also resign on Wednesday

Justice Secretary David Gauke is believed to be preparing to resign immediately before Mr Johnson arrives at Downing Street to take office

David Gauke, Philip Hammond and Rory Stewart are all planning to resign just hours before Boris Johnson is expected to move into Number 10 next week to deny the new PM the chance to sack them.

The trio of Remain-supporting Cabinet ministers are believed to be preparing to quit after Theresa May holds her final prime minister’s questions in the House of Commons on Wednesday.

Meanwhile, it is thought they could be joined by more than a dozen junior ministers who believe they will be on the way out of the government any way once Mr Johnson takes office.

Mrs May will go to Buckingham Palace after PMQs to see the Queen to formally resign before the winner of the Tory leadership contest goes to see the monarch to ask permission to form the next government.

But by the time Mr Johnson, the overwhelming favourite to be the next PM, arrives at Number 10 his premiership could already be facing its first crisis.

The former foreign secretary will reportedly spend the weekend finalising his plans for a ministerial shake up.

However, a mass resignation by ministers opposed to his pledge to keep No Deal as a Brexit option will hardly paint the picture of stability which the new PM will want to cultivate.

The claims came after Remain-backing MPs led by Mr Hammond inflicted a damaging defeat on the government yesterday. 

Rebel MPs successfully agreed an amendment designed to stop Mr Johnson suspending parliament to force through a disorderly Brexit.

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