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UK's Covid cases may be shrinking because children have developed 'high levels' of immunity

High infection rates among children has led to 'high levels of immunity in children', which may cause cases to plateau and drop, SAGE scientist Professor John Edmunds said

Covid cases in the UK are falling because of natural immunity in youngsters, triggered by high infection rates, a Government adviser said today.

SAGE scientist Professor John Edmunds said infections in the last few months have been driven by 'huge numbers' of cases in children.

This has led to 'high levels of immunity in children', which may cause cases to plateau and drop, he said. 

The US yesterday moved one step closer to jabbing five-year-olds, with advisers telling health agencies the benefits for jabbing children aged between five and 11 outweigh the risks. 

Covid cases in the UK reached a three-month high last week, with more than 50,000 tests recorded for three days in a row. Latest figures from the ONS shows nearly a tenth of all secondary school students were infected earlier this month.

Doctors, some scientists and Labour called for Plan B — mandatory face masks, wokr from home guidance and vaccine passports — to be implemented in a bid to control infections. But cases have now been falling for three days in a row without the intervention.

Professor Edmunds, of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, told BBC Radio 4's Today programme said the consensus among scientific models provided to No10 is 'cases either levelling off or falling in the coming weeks'.

He said: 'That’s because the epidemic in the last few months has been really driven by huge numbers of cases in children. I mean really huge numbers of cases in children. 

'And that will eventually lead to high levels of immunity in children and it may be that we’re achieving that now. 

'Or achieving I think is the wrong word, but it might be that we’re getting to high levels of immunity in children through these really high rates of infection we’ve had and it may start to level off.'

But Professor Edmunds warned the models are also aligned on infections increasing again due to waning immunity and a return to normality.