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Teenager lucky to be alive getting struck by lightning as his grateful mother reveals what saved him

A Queensland mother has revealed the extraordinary reason her young son has survived being hit by a bolt of lightning. 

Talyn Rose, 14, is lucky to be alive after the powerful electrical charge threw him to the ground outside the Robina State High School last Friday. 

The teenager had been walking into school when a powerful lightning bolt bounced off a nearby metal pole, travelled up his body and shot back out his arm.   

His mother, Michelle Nimmo has revealed it was the thick rubber soles of her son's school shoes that absorbed the majority of the current, saving his life. 

Queensland teenager Talyn Rose, 14, (pictured) is lucky to be alive after a giant spark of electricity threw him off his feet outside his high school on Friday

The teenager had been walking into Robina State High School (pictured) when a powerful lightning bolt bounced off a nearby metal pole, travelled up his body and back out his arm

A thunderstorm had been brewing all morning when she dropped Talyn to school on a seemingly ordinary Friday, Ms Nimmo told 7NEWS.

She recalled receiving a call from the school just minutes after she had waved her son goodbye, informing her an ambulance was on its way to pick him up. 

'It was absolutely bucketing down rain and I could barely hear them or believe what they were saying,' she recalled. 

The power of the bolt threw Talyn to the ground and caused every one of his muscles to tense and then go completely numb. 

He later told his mother he could barely hear or feel anything for a whole minute following the enormous electric shock.  

Luckily, a father sitting inside his car witnessed the terrifying scene and ran to his aid, taking the 14-year-old inside the school to safety.

The power of the bolt threw Talyn to the ground and caused every one of his muscles to tense before he felt himself going completely numb

Doctors said Talyn was lucky to survive the lightning bolt and credited the thick rubber soles of his school shoes as what had saved him (pictured, temporary markings caused by the bolt)

Amazingly, Talyn was already beginning to recover from the giant zap when his mother arrived, but was still taken to hospital to get his vitals checked.

Doctors told Ms Nimmo her son was lucky to survive the lightning bolt and said the thick rubber soles of his school shoes likely saved his life. 

'Paramedics said he is extremely lucky to be alive and that they have never seen anything like it in their whole careers,' she said.

Ms Nimmo said her son was affectionately called the 'lightning kid' around the hospital with doctors marveling at the close save.

Apart from temporary markings seen on the teenager's feet and shoulders, Talyn has remarkably made a full recovery from the bolt. 

Ms Nimmo told Daily Mail Australia the marks - called Litchenberg figures - took three days to completely fade from Talyn's body. 

'They would have been a pretty cool conversation starter,' she joked. 

Apart from the Litchenberg markings seen on the teenager's feet and shoulders (pictured) Talyn has remarkably made a full recovery 

The teenager's mother said it had been 'bucketing down rain' on the morning her son was struck by lightning (pictured, a storm brews over Brisbane)

A single stroke of lightning releases up to 500 million volts and a temperature of 27,000 degrees, three times hotter than the surface of the sun. 

The odds of being struck by lightning are 1 in 1.6million, the Australian Geographic estimates. 

Experts advise those caught in thunderstorms to seek shelter in cars - as the metal conducts the electric charge safely - or to crouch low in a ditch. 

Small open structures like tents are to be avoided as well as standing near tall objects like trees or poles that attract lightning. 

While around 100 people survive a lightning strike each year, 10 do not.