United Kingdom

Stunning pink castle in Aberdeenshire where King Robert the Bruce once stayed goes on sale for £1.5m

Your childhood dreams of being king - or queen - of the castle could be about to come true, if you've got a cool £1.5million to spare. 

A romantic pink castle in rural Aberdeenshire has gone on the market, complete with its own historic chapel, labyrinth and a stylish 'endless pool'.

The Grade A listed property, listed with Knight Frank, is situated on the Park Estate, which was originally part of the Royal Forest of Banff and was granted by King Alexander II to Norman knight Sir Walram de Normanville in 1242.

Just six miles from the Moray Coast, it is reputed to have provided accommodation for King Robert the Bruce during his forays north in turbulent times. 

A romantic pink castle in rural Aberdeenshire has gone on the market, complete with its own historic chapel, labyrinth and a stylish 'endless pool'

Fancy a dip? In front of the castle lies a dual propulsion endless swimming pool encased in its own enclosure

The rambling, harled castle at the end of a tree-lined driveway is believed to have foundations which date back to the 13th century, but was rebuilt into a Z-plan tower house in 1536.

In the 1700s, a range of extensions were added, transforming it from a fortified house into a grand Georgian country mansion, while a gothic tower was added in 1829. 

The castle spans four floors and includes six large reception rooms, eight bedrooms and nine bathrooms, four of which are en suite. 

There's also a two-bedroom flat on the top floor, which the current owner - who purchased it in 2007 - uses as their primary residence.

One of its stand-out rooms is the Great Hall, with a large open fireplace, intricate panelling and medieval painted ceiling 

The castle has been sympathetically decorated to honour the property's history. Pictured: the medieval themed dining room

Pictured: one of the six principal reception rooms which has been decked out in a more Georgian style to reflect its history throughout the ages

In the 1700s, a range of extensions were added, transforming it from a fortified house into a grand Georgian country mansion, while a gothic tower was added in 1829

The castle also boasts a large family kitchen with units lining the walls, a large range cooker and a farmhouse sink, as well as space for a 10-seater dining table

Many of the rooms feature window seats which offer the chance to sit and feast your eyes on the expansive grounds

Its been sympathetically furnished, with many of the rooms paying homage to its history, and has been used as a self-catering holiday home and exclusive use venue over the past four years. 

One of its stand-out rooms is the Great Hall, with a large open fireplace, intricate panelling and medieval painted ceiling.

It also boasts three window seats which overlook the immaculately kept front lawns. 

There is also a drawing room which is treated to plenty of natural light through its large Georgian sash windows. 

One of the enormous bedrooms. There are eight in total, as well as a two-bedroom flat on the top floor which is currently occupied by the owner while the rest of property is let to holidaymakers

There are nine bathrooms, four of which are en suite. This one features a large free-standing bath and an original fireplace as well as a walk in shower

This chic Georgian bedroom shows off the rounded shape of the castle and is decorated in a more modern style, with chandeliers adding a touch of elegance

One of the en suite bathrooms which features more modern decor, including a stencil-effect tiled floor, a marble walk-in shower and a free-standing bath

For after dinner soirees there's a billiard room featuring a cosy wood burning stove, as well as a barrel vaulted dining room and even a historic chapel.   

It would be easy to get lost in the sprawling grounds, which extend to 35.67 acres and feature sweeping lawns, ponds and woodland walks.

There's also a labyrinth, a rose garden, a croquet lawn and a large walled garden with an orchard.

The grounds are also home to an orchard and a croquet lawn, plus there is a potting shed and a triple garage as well as a dual propulsion endless swimming pool encased in its own enclosure.    

A short distance from the main house nestled among the trees in the grounds sits a pavillion, built by an award-winning architect in 2018

The pavillion is kitted out with a large function room, kitchen and three toilets and is currently used for events including weddings, ceilidhs, conferences and meetings

The swimming pool in the grounds, encased in a glass surround to protect it from the elements, is a relatively new addition installed by the current owner

The rambling, harled castle at the end of a tree-lined driveway is believed to have foundations which date back to the 13th century, but was rebuilt into a Z-plan tower house in 1536

A short distance from the main house sits a pavillion, built by an award-winning architect in 2018 and kitted out with a large function room, kitchen and three toilets.

It's currently used for events including weddings, ceilidhs, conferences and meetings. 

Further afield there are 17 acres worth of pasture which are used to graze a small herd of Highland cattle. 

Who was Robert the Bruce, hero of Bannockburn?

Robert the Bruce, pictured, became king of Scotland after he murdered his main rival in 1306 and drove the English out of the country following the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314

Robert Bruce was king of Scotland between 1306 until his death in 1329. 

He is most famous for the Battle of Bannockburn, although he faced an eight-year war against enemies in Scotland loyal to England. 

The warrior king took the Scottish crown by force, murdering his rival John Comyn in a Franciscan church in Dumfires on February 10, 1306 before being crowned at Scone the following month. 

Edward I marched north to deal with the threat posed by Robert, but he died at Burgh-on-Sands - within sight of the Scottish border. 

Edward II continued the war against Robert, but was not a military commander such as his father.

The decisive battle saw Robert's forces defeat the English army on June 24, 1314.

Following the defeat of the English at Bannockburn, a decree stated all Scottish lords who continued loyalty to England should lose their land. 

It took 14 years for the English, by now led by Edward III, to agree to a peace treaty and recognise Robert as king of Scotland. 

The 1328 Treaty of Northampton also abandoned any English claim of overlordship. 

However, in his final years, it is believed Robert suffered from leprosy.   

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