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'QAnon Shaman' hires Kyle Rittenhouse's former attorney to appeal sentence for part in Capitol riot 

'QAnon Shaman' Jacob Chansley has hired one of Kyle Rittenhouse's former attorneys to appeal his 41-month prison sentence for taking part in the Capitol riot.

Chansley, 34, was sentenced to more than three years - 41 months - in federal prison for his role in the January 6 riot, where he infamously donned a horned fur hat and patriotic face paint while carrying a spear and megaphone as he bore his bare, tattooed torso through the Capitol.

District Judge Royce Lamberth handed Chansley the sentence on November 17, which has since prompted the rioter to hire attorney John Pierce, who was previously employed by 18-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse, who was acquitted of murder earlier this month.

In an interview with Fox News host Tucker Carlson last week, the teenager trashed Pierce, claiming he raised money on Rittenhouse's behalf after he was jailed for killing two people and wounding a third in Kenosha, Wisconsin, in August 2020.

Rittenhouse said that while the lawyers had raised enough bail money by mid-September, they chose not to post his bail because they wanted to use him for their own cause. 

The Rittenhouse family fired Pierce in February. The attorney is representing several Capitol riot defendants.

'QAnon Shaman' Jacob Chansley (left) has hired one of Kyle Rittenhouse's former attorneys John Pierce (right) to appeal his 41-month prison sentence for taking part in the Capitol riot

Prosecutors had recommended a 51-month sentence for Chansley (pictured in court sketch) as a deterrence to 'future rioters' 

Chansley's former attorney, Albert Watkins (pictured), denied claims that his ex-client 'personally authorized Mr Pierce to represent him'

Now, Pierce will be working with Chansley to appeal the judge's sentence after the s-called QAnon Shaman pleaded guilty in September to obstructing an official proceeding when he and thousands of supporters of then-President Donald Trump stormed the building in an attempt to stop Congress from certifying President Joe Biden's election victory.

The Phoenix resident has been jailed since his arrest six months ago, and his defense attorney has now made five separate attempts to have him released.

Pierce filed a notice of appearance in Judge Lamberth's court stating he was going to appeal the sentence the judge gave to Chansley, as reported by Newsweek.

'Chansley will be pursuing all remedies available to him under the Constitution and federal statutory law with respect to the outcome of the criminal prosecution of him by the United States Department of Justice,' the attorney wrote in a press release.

'This includes a possible direct appeal of his conviction and sentence to the United States Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, as well as claims of "Ineffective Assistance of Counsel" in the appropriate venue,' he added.

Pierce was formerly represented by Albert Watkins, who denied claims that Chansley 'personally authorized Mr. Pierce to represent him,' according to Newsweek.

In response, the judge ordered a status conference to take place on November 29, which Pierce and Watkins were both called on to attend, to clarify who was on Chansley's counsel.

Chansley became the face of the failed insurrection when he appeared on the US Senate floor semi-nude, sporting body paint and a horned fur hat (pictured)

Chanlsley was one of thousands of Trump supporters who stormed the US Capitol building on January 6 to stop the certification of President Joe Biden 

Newsweek reported that during the hearing, Chansley told the judge that he fired Watkins and brought in Pierce and another lawyer, William Shipley, to look into his options moving forward. 

For his sentencing, Chansley appeared in court in a dark green prison jumpsuit, beard and shaved head (pictured)

He also suggested that his new lawyers would file an appeal on his behalf. 

Watkins told reporters after the hearing: 'Mr Chansley is an extremely smart man, very intelligent, if not savant-like, and I sincerely wish him all the best in his life.'

Watkins quoted Forrest Gump in his most recent court filing requesting for the fifth time that his client be sentenced to time served.

Watkins' 23-page sentencing memorandum filed on behalf of Chansley on November 9 opened with a line from the 1994 movie starring Tom Hanks: 'My momma always said, you’ve got to put the past behind you before you can move on.'

Watkins typed the film quote in bold and attributed it to the fictional character, but misspelled his name as 'Forest Gump'.  

Meanwhile, federal prosecutors filed their own 28-page sentencing memorandum asking Judge Lamberth to sentence Chansley to 51 months behind bars, which would make it the longest prison term stemming from the deadly riot so far.

Chansley was among the wave of rioters who spearheaded the rush into the Capitol while carrying a spear and wrote a note to then-Vice President Mike Pence that said: 'It’s only a matter of time, justice is coming.'

He emerged as the de-facto face of the failed insurrection when he appeared on the US Senate floor semi-nude and has since apologized for his actions, though he also has said he didn’t regret his loyalty to former President Donald Trump.

LONGEST CAPITOL RIOT SENTENCES: 

  1. Jacob Chansley: Chansley, 34, from Arizona, known as the 'QAnon Shaman,' was sentenced on November 17 to 41 months in prison for storming the US Capitol while armed with a spear.
  2. Scott Fairlamb: The 44-year-old former MMA fighter from New Jersey was sentenced to 41 months in prison for assaulting a police officer during the January 6 riots. 
  3. Troy Smocks: The 58-year-old Dallas resident was sentenced to 14 months in prison for posting threats against the US Congress on Parler, even though he did not enter the Capitol.
  4. Paul Hodgkins: The 38-year-old Florida crane operator was sentenced to 8 months in prison for walking onto the US Senate floor while carrying a red 'Trump 2020' flag. 

After his arrest, Chansley has repeatedly made headlines by asking for a presidential pardon from Trump while he was still in office, staging a hunger strike to get organic food in lockup, and agreeing to an unsanctioned jailhouse interview with 60 Minutes.

Chansley is expected to receive credit for the roughly 10 months he has spent in jail, which would reduce his prison sentence to about 31 months. 

When given a chance to speak, Chansley launched into a wide-ranging and often rambling speech in which he talked about his feelings of guilt and remorse.

'I admit to the world, I was wrong. I have no excuses. My behavior was indefensible,' he said before insisting that he is not a violent man, a domestic terrorist or a 'white supremacist'.

As part of his impassioned 30-minute-long monologue, Chansley quoted Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, Jesus, and the prison break film The Shawshank Redemption.

'The hardest part about this is to know that I'm to blame. To have to look in the mirror and know, you really messed up, royally,' Chansley said.

He said he was wrong to break the law - a decision that landed him in solitary confinement.

'I should do what Gandhi would do and take responsibility,' Chansley added during his lengthy speech before he was sentenced. 'There's no ifs, ands or buts about it, that's what men of honor do.' 

While appearing in court in a dark green prison jumpsuit, beard and shaved head he also promised to never have to be jailed again. 

Lamberth was seemingly taken aback by the defendant's remarks, which he said were 'akin to the kind of thing Martin Luther King would have said'.

Lamberth added that he believed Chansley had done a lot to convince the court he is 'on the right track' since the image of him holding a flagpole topped with a spear tip and looking as if he were howling was one of the most striking to emerge from the riot.

Chansley previously called himself the 'QAnon Shaman' but has since repudiated the QAnon movement, which is centered on the baseless belief that Trump was fighting a cabal of Satan-worshipping, child sex trafficking cannibals. 

Chansley previously called himself the 'QAnon Shaman' but has since repudiated the QAnon movement, which is centered on the baseless belief that Trump was fighting a cabal of Satan-worshipping, child sex trafficking cannibals

The fall of the 'QAnon Shaman': Jacob Chansley, 33, went from math club member in high school to failed actor to getting kicked out of military for refusing a vaccine to living with his mom and embracing wacky conspiracies 

The 'QAnon Shaman' who was sentenced to more than three years in federal prison for his role in the January 6 riots is a failed actor who lived with mother, wrote two books about his New Age spiritual beliefs, and was kicked out of the military for refusing an anthrax vaccine.

Jacob Chansley, the spear-carrying rioter whose horned fur hat, tattooed bare chest and face paint made him one of the more recognizable figures in the assault on the Capitol, was sentenced on Wednesday to 41 months in prison.

Chansley, who pleaded guilty to a felony charge of obstructing an official proceeding, was among the first rioters to enter the building.

He has acknowledged using a bullhorn to rile up the mob, offering thanks in a prayer while in the Senate for having the chance to get rid of traitors and scratching out a threatening note to Vice President Mike Pence saying, 'It's Only A Matter of Time. Justice Is Coming!'

Though he isn't accused of violence, prosecutors say Chansley, of Arizona, was the 'public face of the Capitol riot' who went into the attack with a weapon, ignored repeated police orders to leave the building and gloated about his actions in the days immediately after the attack.

Before he became the 'QAnon Shaman,' Chansley was a failed actor who lived with his mother in her Glendale, Arizona, home

The image of Chansley holding a flagpole topped with a spear tip and looking as if he were howling was one of the most striking to emerge from the riot.

He previously called himself the 'QAnon Shaman' but has since repudiated the QAnon movement, which is centered on the baseless belief that former President Donald Trump was fighting a cabal of Satan-worshipping, child sex trafficking cannibals.

Days after the riot, he surrendered himself to the FBI in Phoenix.

Before images of Chansley inside the US Senate chamber made headline news worldwide, he was living with his 56-year-old mother, Martha, in her $199,000 home in Glendale, Arizona.

In January 2019, he was kicked out of his $900-a-month apartment for failing to keep up on his rent.

At the time, he owed $1,247 in back rent.

Neighbors told DailyMail.com that Chansley had no steady job and was often seen wandering the area in his horned shaman costume.

Chansley’s antics are a far cry from the life he had been hoping for when he graduated from Moon Valley High School in 2005 (pictured are his yearbook photos, Chansley was in the Debate and Math clubs). 

Yearbook photos obtained by DailyMail.com show a fresh-faced blond teenager seen smiling with his arms around younger half-brother Tyler, 30

A headshot was accompanied by the motto: ‘There is no greater gift than the gift of life so use it to its fullest'

Friends from school say he has changed dramatically over the 15 years since he left Moon Valley High. He is pictured in Math club

A profile on film industry site Backstage lists just one project – volunteering at a Theater Camp for disadvantaged children organized by local charity, Free Arts of Arizona, in 2018

One neighbor said Chansley was often seen dancing on the roof of his mother's home. The neighbor said the ritual was 'bizarre.'

Chansley would often show up at political protests in Arizona. In July, he filmed himself during a demonstration in which he proclaimed that COVID-19 was a hoax.

In September, he led a protest at Arrowhead Mall in Glendale, Arizona, where he rambled about child abusers and claimed that a spiral sign close to the bathrooms is actually ‘an FBI pedophile code’ while clutching a sign that read ‘Q sent me’.

He was also part of a rowdy crowd of Trump supporters chanting ‘Stop the Steal’ who showed up at a tabulation center in Maricopa County on November 5.

Chansley’s antics are a far cry from the life he had been hoping for when he graduated from Moon Valley High School in 2005.

Yearbook photos obtained by DailyMail.com show a fresh-faced blond teenager seen smiling with his arms around younger half-brother Tyler, 30.

A headshot was accompanied by the motto: ‘There is no greater gift than the gift of life so use it to its fullest.’

Along with Tyler, Chansley was also a member of the school debating team and was part of the Moon Valley High Math Club.

He enlisted out of Arizona as a supply clerk on September 26, 2005. He completed recruit training and Military Occupational Specialty school and was assigned to the USS Kitty Hawk in March 2006. A file image of the USS Kitty Hawk and USS Constellation at sail in the Arabian Gulf in April 2003 above

He stayed there until September 29, 2007, when he was transferred to a Transient Personnel Unit in Puget Sound in Washington state (above)

But while Tyler also joined the ‘Rocket Town’ cultural diversity program – describing his experience of spending time with students of color as ‘like being with my family’ – Chansley did not.

Friends from school say he has changed dramatically over the 15 years since he left Moon Valley High.

Former classmate Chris Trubl, 30, of Peoria, Arizona, described his behavior on Wednesday as ‘crazy stuff’.

He said: ‘It’s been 15 years since he left school and he has changed a lot. I haven’t seen him for a few years and I didn’t recognize him when I saw him at the Capitol.

‘I only realized it was him when I saw posts from people at school on social media. He’s changed a lot. That was some crazy stuff he was doing there.’

After leaving school, Chansley’s first act was to change his name.

 Chansley has previously admitted his belief in QAnon after he started after reading conspiracy theories on the internet

In August 2005, he applied to replace his mother’s maiden name - Angeli - with his 63-year-old stepfather Glen’s last name.

In the application, he wrote: ‘I want my last name to be that of my stepfather, my dad. I was not legally adopted by my stepfather while a minor. Angeli is my mother’s last name.’

Chansley had a short-lived career in the Navy, where he enlisted out of Arizona as a supply clerk on September 26, 2005 before he was given the boot about two years later for refusing to take a vaccine, according to Task and Purpose. 

He completed recruit training and Military Occupational Specialty school and was assigned to the USS Kitty Hawk in March 2006.

He stayed there until September 29, 2007, when he was transferred to a Transient Personnel Unit in Puget Sound in Washington state.

He was processed out of the Navy on October 11 that same year as a seaman’s apprentice, meaning he got out of the Navy as a boot E-2 after two years and 15 days of service, about 15 years before the Capitol protest.

Navy officials have declined to provide the characterization of his discharge.

The anthrax vaccine fights against a rare, but serious bacterial illness. The military was vaccinated against it because anthrax spores have been used as biological weapons.

According to Chansley’s military record notes he received the National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, and the Navy and Marine Corps Overseas Service Ribbon but no personal awards.

Now 33, Chansley uses both names but prefers to use Angeli to tout for work – unsuccessfully – as an actor.

A profile on film industry site Backstage lists just one project – volunteering at a Theater Camp for disadvantaged children organized by local charity, Free Arts of Arizona, in 2018.

Chansley has been living with his mother Martha, 56, (left and right) since January 2019 

Photos accompanying the listing show a tattooed and bearded Chansley flexing his muscles in a flag-print shirt and bandana, while another shows him dressed in his infamous shaman outfit with a blacked up face.

Under education, he writes that he attended the school of ‘hard knocks’ and describes himself as a ‘Voice Over and Acting Master’.

Writing about his career, he says: ‘I am a highly talented actor, voiceover artist and singer. I am capable of performing over 30 different voices and numerous different accents.

‘I am also very skilled at embodying characters and expressing emotions in a way that causes people to become captivated and entranced.

‘My ability to memorize lines is only rivaled by my ability to perform improv and make it appear if my lines were memorized.

‘I am always increasing my abilities and honing my techniques to be the best of the best at what I do.’

Chansley has also written two books. One of them is titled Will & Power: Inside the Living Library, though he wrote it under the pen name 'Loan Wolf.' Using the name Jacob Angeli, he also wrote One Mind at a Time: A Deep State of Illusion.

Chansley’s main occupation now appears to be protest and he has become a fixture at anti-lockdown rallies in Arizona over the past year.

At one, in July 2020, he was filmed himself screaming that the Covid-19 second wave is ‘bulls**t’, adding ‘COVID-1984 is a globalist propaganda hoax’ – a reference to the George Orwell novel.

His Twitter feed is dominated by conspiracy videos and, more recently, details of his plans to attend the MAGA march in DC.

One, posted January 5, defends Proud Boys boss Enrique Tarrio who was banned from DC the day before the Capitol riot. 

Chansley has also written two books. One of them is titled Will & Power: Inside the Living Library, though he wrote it under the pen name 'Loan Wolf.'

Using the name Jacob Angeli, he also wrote One Mind at a Time: A Deep State of Illusion.