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Paul Hollywood set to be divorced at London court today

Paul Hollywood his then wife Alexandra are pictured at The O2 in London in January 2015

Great British Bake Off star Paul Hollywood is set to be divorced from his estranged wife at a London court.

The 53-year-old celebrity baker split from Alexandra Hollywood, 55, in 2017 after 19 years of marriage.

Mr and Mrs Hollywood's case is listed to be heard by a judge at the Central Family Court in London today.

District Judge Robert Duddridge is due to grant a decree nisi, which is the first step towards their divorce being finalised.

Once a decree nisi has been granted, a divorce petitioner has to wait six weeks and a day to apply for a decree absolute – the final dissolution of the marriage.

Mr and Mrs Hollywood were previously reunited following a brief separation in 2013 after he admitted having an affair with Marcela Valladolid, his co-star on the US version of Bake Off.

At a hearing earlier this month, Judge Martin O'Dwyer was told that a week-long hearing to resolve contested financial remedy proceedings was due to begin on July 22.

Mr Hollywood admitted having an affair with Marcela Valladolid, his co-star on the US version of Bake Off. They are pictured together on the CBS show in February 2013

Mr Hollywood is pictured with his Bake Off co-stars Noel Fielding, Sandi Toksvig and Prue Leith

Mr and Mrs Hollywood are pictured in October 2006 outside their home in Kent at the time

However, Mr Hollywood's legal team confirmed yesterday that the hearing will no longer go ahead, by agreement between the parties and with the court's approval.

Judge O'Dwyer previously imposed reporting restrictions preventing the publication of any information relating to the parties' finances which came out of the proceedings, but not covering any information which was 'legitimately in the public domain'.

Mr Hollywood's barrister, Adam Wolanski QC, had expressed concern that newspaper reports contained information about the parties' finances which might have been leaked.

But Alexander Chandler, representing Mrs Hollywood, said his client had not disclosed any information to the press, telling the court: 'She was not the source and she had nothing to do with that story which referred to the financial details of the parties.'

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