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Paco Rabanne launches world's first connected perfume that makes you feel sexy

Fashion and fragrance giant Paco Rabanne has created the first-ever perfume scientifically proven to make you feel sexy.

The new Phantom fragrance for men was formulated by four master perfumers who used artificial intelligence, algorithms and neuroscience to develop a scent that enhances feelings of confidence, energy and sensuality as soon as it touches the skin.

After lengthy experimentation with unusual pairings, the French fashion brand settled on a blend of natural, vegan-friendly ingredients including lavender, lemon, patchouli, vetiver and vanilla, poured into the world's first refillable 'smart' bottle.

The new Phantom fragrance from Paco Rabanne (pictured) was formulated by four master perfumers who used artificial intelligence, algorithms and neuroscience to develop a scent that enhances feelings of confidence, energy and sensuality as soon as it touches the skin

All you have to do is tap your phone on the top of the bottle to access a world of augmented reality.

Enormous effort went into the development of the revolutionary fragrance, which was tested on young men aged between 18 and 35 to determine which emotions it triggered in the brain.

The ingredients were selected after neuroscientists demonstrated they can activate brain areas associated with seduction, alertness and energy.

The fragrance launched in Australia on August 1, and is now available at Myer with prices starting from $106 (AUD). 

Paco Rabanne's innovative fragrance may be the first to make wearers feel sexy, but it's not the first the first time a brand has used scientific formulas in its scents.

How scent can evoke emotions and memories 

The anatomy of the human brain is such that emotion and memory can be triggered by scents and smells.

Scientists studying olfaction have shed light on how sense of smell is connected to brain function.

According to Brain Facts, smell begins at the back of the nose where millions of sensory neurons lie.

The tips of these neurons contain proteins called receptors which bind odour molecules.

Each receptor can be activated by many different odour molecules, but the forces that bind receptors and odour molecules can vary greatly in strength meaning some interactions fit better than others.

Once an odour molecule binds to a receptor, it triggers an electrical signal that travels from the sensory neurons to the olfactory bulb that relays the signal to other brain areas for processing.

Smell information goes to the piriform cortex and the thalamus, a structure that serves as a sensory analysis station for the brain.

When we experience a rush of emotion or memory after sniffing a particular scent, this happens as a result of the thalamus sending smell information to the hippocampus and amygdala, key brain regions involved in learning and memory.

Source: BrainFacts.org

After lengthy experimentation with unusual pairings, the French fashion brand settled on a blend of vegan-friendly ingredients including lavender, lemon, patchouli, vetiver and vanilla

A contactless communication chip built into the cap of the robotic container syncs to your phone through an app loaded with interactive games, filters and personalised playlists

Back in September 2019, Adidas launched a fragrance collection designed to increase your desire and ability to exercise.

The line included two masculine and two feminine scents, scientifically formulated to change your mindset towards working out.

Created in collaboration with elite athletes, each fragrance activates a unique emotional centre of the brain and nervous system to enhance performance. 

Prices start at $29 for 30ml and $49 for 100ml bottles from stockists such as Chemist Warehouse, My Chemist and My Beauty Spot. 

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