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Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi is 'missing' after being moved to an undisclosed location

Myanmar's ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi is said to be 'missing' after a military junta moved her from house arrest to an undisclosed location as violent protests continue.

Suu Kyi, 75, had been detained under house arrest in the capital Naypyitaw since the coup on February 1 but has since been moved, the Myanmar Now website said earlier today, citing officials in her party.   

The National League for Democracy sources said she was taken away six days ago, the website reported.

'We don't know where she's being kept anymore,' Myanmar Now quoted one senior NLD source as saying on condition of anonymity.

Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi, 75, (pictured previously) had been detained under house arrest in the capital Naypyitaw since the coup on February 1 but has since been moved, the Myanmar Now website said earlier today, citing officials in her party

Khin Maung Zaw, a lawyer for Suu Kyi, had previously complained that he had been given no access ahead of a court appearance set for March 1. 

'I need instructions from her on how to conduct our defence at the court... I'm concerned that there will be a loss of rights to access to justice and access to legal counsel,' he said. 

Authorities immediately did not respond to a request for comment. 

It comes as police attempted to disperse protesters in Myanmar's two biggest cities on Friday by firing stun grenades, rubber bullets and guns into the air in a crackdown on weeks of demonstrations that have challenged the army's bid to re-impose its rule.

At least one person was wounded in the protests in the main city of Yangon, a witness said.

Several people were also hurt in the second city of Mandalay where an emergency service worker said children were hurt there and media published pictures of two with minor injuries as well as of one man with a bloody leg wound. 

It was not clear how they were hurt. 

Police were not immediately available for comment.

It comes as police (pictured earlier today) attempted to disperse protesters in Myanmar's two biggest cities on Friday by firing stun grenades, rubber bullets and guns into the air

Several people were also hurt in the second city of Mandalay. Pictured: An injured protester is escorted as police tried to disperse a demonstration against the military coup in Mandalay earlier today

The Southeast Asian country has been in crisis since the army seized power on February 1 and detained government leader Suu Kyi and much of her party leadership after the military complained of fraud in a November election her party won. 

The election commission said the vote was fair. 

There have been daily protests and strikes by democracy supporters for about three weeks, often drawing hundreds of thousands of people across the ethnically diverse country. 

'One house let me in to hide,' a journalist told Reuters from the scene. 'I can't leave yet as the police are very near and firing into the air.'

Several people were detained, witnesses said, among them a Japanese journalist who was held briefly.  

At least one person was wounded in the protests in the main city of Yangon (crowds pictured there earlier today), a witness said

Police also broke up protests in the capital, Naypyitaw (crowds pictured), the central town of Magwe and in the western hill town of Hakha, according to witnesses and social media posts

Police also broke up protests in the capital, Naypyitaw, the central town of Magwe and in the western hill town of Hakha, according to witnesses and social media posts. 

Security forces have been more restrained than they were during earlier bouts of protest in the course of nearly half a century of military rule.

Military chief General Min Aung Hlaing says authorities were using minimal force. 

Nevertheless, at least three protesters have died and the army says a policeman was also killed.

Suu Kyi, the daughter of Myanmar's independence hero, spent nearly 15 years under house arrest under previous juntas. 

Several people were detained (one pictured being escorted by police), witnesses said, among them a Japanese journalist who was held briefly

Security forces (riot police pictured in Yangon) have been more restrained than they were during earlier bouts of protest in the course of nearly half a century of military rule

She faces charges of illegally importing six walkie-talkie radios and of violating a natural disaster law by breaching coronavirus protocols.

Protesters say her party's election victory must be respected.

But the military replaced the election commission's top officials and its new chairman, citing fraud and voter-list errors, said on Friday the polls had been annulled, the Irrawaddy online media outlet reported.

The NLD said in a statement the ruling was an insult to voters and the military did not have the authority to appoint a new election commission.

The army has promised a new election but has not set a date. 

A vote is not expected until after a one-year state of emergency the military imposed when it seized power.

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