United Kingdom
This article was added by the user . TheWorldNews is not responsible for the content of the platform.

Minority Report-style AI able to predict riots is being developed by Russia 

Russia is believed to be developing a special Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to predict and then prevent riots and protests in the latest part of a Kremlin crackdown on dissent.

The technology will use machine learning to carry out a 'multi-factor, comprehensive analysis of the likelihood of riots and unauthorised public events' taking place and then alerts security services to them.

The country's Emergency Situations Ministry is planning to have the technology in place in 2022, according to the Kommersant news website.

The software will also analyse news, social media, CCTV and public transport data to foresee upcoming riots, and has drawn comparisons to the Tom Cruise film Minority Report.

Russia is believed to be developing a special Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to predict and then prevent riots and protests in the latest part of a Kremlin crackdown on dissent. Pictured: Pro Alexei Navalny protestors clash with police in January following his arrest

The 2002 Hollywood blockbuster is set the year 2054, where a specialized police department called Precrime arrests people based on foreknowledge of crimes they are about to commit. 

Rostec, the state-owned conglomerate, is believed to be behind production of the software through its data business, the National Center of Informatization. 

It plans to have the software available by next year as part of a Kremlin ministry's 'Safe City' project.

It is reported that the software will also be able to tell the difference between political and religious rallies and anti-government protests.

And if the system is unable to predict the event before it begins, it can 'help prevent escalation' through monitoring crowds and assisting police forces.

The AI software development is seen as the latest part of a crackdown on dissent in Russia by President Vladimir Putin.

The software will also analyse news, social media, CCTV and public transport data to foresee upcoming riots, and has drawn comparisons to the Tom Cruise film Minority Report (pictured)

This started in February after vocal opposition leader Alexei Navalny was jailed for allegedly violating the conditions of a suspended sentence - sparking nationwide protests.

The crackdown on political opposition has continued since then.

It was reported that around a third of Mr Navalny's regional coordinators have left Russia for eastern Europe after his organisation was banned for being deemed 'extremist'.

A new law passed in January also prevents members of 'extremist'-labelled organisations from standing in elections for a period of three to five years.

Founders and leaders of designated groups will not be able to run for elected office for five years after a court's decision to ban the group.

Another rule change also dictates that any rally larger than one person must obtain permission from the authorities, but many opposition-leaning rallies are denied this.