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Man, 18, sheds more than 110LBS in seven months to join the U.S. Army

A young man who wants to serve in the military has shed a whopping 114lbs to meet the U.S. Army's weight requirements.  

Luis Pinto, 18, from Las Vegas, Nevada, went from 317lbs to 203lbs in just seven months after speaking to an army recruiter and learning he wouldn't be able to enlist at his size.  

'I went over the requirements and everything I'd need and the only thing holding me back was my weight,' he told KTRK. 'So, I knew that something needed to be done. 

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Then and wow: Luis Pinto from Las Vegas, Nevada, went from 317lbs (left) to 203lbs (right) in just seven months so he could enlist in the U.S. Army

Pinto admitted that he always saw himself as a bigger guy because he had always been larger than his peers. 

Life-changing moment: After speaking with an army recruiter, he realized the only thing holding him back was his weight. 

'My whole life, I've been a big kid. I've always been,' he said. 'In high school, I played football and I was a lineman. 

'I was one of those big guys walking around campus, and I guess I kind of got used to that, which probably isn't the best thing.' 

Pinto didn't waste any time losing weight and shed nearly 20lbs in just two weeks.

'It was one of those things where I talked to him and was like, if you put the dedication into it and you actually work at it, it's something you could do,' said Pinto's recruiter, Philip Long, a staff sergeant in the U.S. Army. 

'And then the first two weeks, he came in, he was already down to like 298. So, you know he'd been working.' 

According to Long, less than 30 percent of today's youth are eligible for military service. The number one disqualifier of 18-34 year-olds is the failure to meet the height and weight requirement.  

However, Pinto was determined to join the army, and he refused to let his weight stop him. 

Throwback: Pinto admitted that he always saw himself as a bigger guy because he had always been larger than his peers

Working for it: Pinto watched his diet, ran, and lifted weights to reach his goal weight of 205lbs

According to Long, less than 30 percent of today's youth are eligible for military service. Failure to meet the military's height and weight requirements is the number one disqualifier of 18-34 year-olds.  

However, Pinto was determined to join the army, and he refused to let his weight stop him.  

'I just didn’t see myself working a regular 9-to-5 every day. I definitely wanted to do something, get out there. I knew that if I were to pick up a job, I’ll be staying here for a while,' he told KTNV. 'There’s a whole world out there and I definitely wanted to go and see it.'  

Not only did Pinto watch his diet, but he also began running and working out to reach his goal weight of 205lbs. 

'When no one was looking, I was doing push-ups in my room, eating right, knowing what to eat,' he said. 

On his way: Pinto received a $16,000 bonus for volunteering to serve as a patriot fire control enhanced operator and maintainer

'I feel like everyone has the power to know what they take into their body, so I just took that into consideration. I just did the right thing at the end of the day.' 

While losing the weight wasn't easy, Sergeant Long said Pinto never gave up.  

'There were a couple times where he hit a plateau. He would lose a pound or two, maybe,' he told KTNV. 'But to continue to push forward and put the effort and dedication in, it inspires me and it should inspire you.'  

The recruiter believes Pinto has an 'amazing' career ahead of him.  

'His dedication, his ability, his mental toughness, it will not only serve him well in the army, but also in life,' he said.  

Pinto received a $16,000 bonus for volunteering to serve as a patriot fire control enhanced operator and maintainer, meaning he will be responsible for advanced missile systems. 

The army recruit's next goal is to be accepted into officer flight training so he can one day become a U.S. Army pilot.  

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