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Legendary pro-wrestler Jimmy Rave, 38, reveals he had both legs amputated after suffering from MRSA

Legendary pro-wrestler Jimmy Rave revealed he had to have both of legs amputated after a recurring case of MRSA - only months after retiring because the staph infection forced doctors to amputate one of his arms. 

Jimmy Rave, 38, tweeted a jarring photo showing the professional wrestler laying in his hospital bed with both legs and his left arm removed because he was again diagnosed with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus - a bacterial infection resistant to antibiotics. 

'I have a history [with] this and would cancel shows often due to this condition,' he wrote on Twitter on Sunday. 

'I've gone this whole time not disclosing my legs because of this embarrassment'. 

Jimmy Rave, 38, revealed on Twitter on Sunday that he had both his legs amputated after contracting  Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) - a staph infection resistant to antibiotics and typically found in hospitals - in both legs 

The former pro wrestler is best known for his work in the Ring Of Honor, a live program featuring the 'best-in-ring action' and new styles that 'developed by fresh, young stars that incorporates wrestling, mixed martial arts and high-flying'

The life-threatening staph infection that is resistant to treatment: What is MRSA?

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a type of bacteria that is resistant to several widely-used antibiotics, which makes it particularly hard to treat. 

Catching the infection early could prevent it spreading and infecting others.

Approximately 30 percent of people carry the Staphylococcus aureus bacteria even in their nose, armpits, groin or buttocks without realizing it.

This can invade the body's bloodstream and release poisonous toxins that kill up to one-fifth of infected patients.

MRSA is most commonly associated with hospitals. 

As well as being highly drug resistant, current screening methods are fairly inaccurate, which allows the infection to spread as a patient moves around both within and outside hospitals.

Even when the infection is successfully treated, it doubles the average length of a patient's hospital stay, as well as increasing healthcare costs.

The WHO recently classified MRSA as high priority on its list for the Research and Development of new drugs.   

Last December, Rave announced on his Instagram that he was ending his pro-wrestling career due to the amputation of his left arm. 

'I have been very blessed for the last 21 years in professional wrestling and getting to live out my dream. Today, that dream has ended for me and I have a new reality,' he wrote on Instagram on December 10, 2020. 

'This post Tuesday [December 8], my world came crashing down when Doctors found an infection in my left arm. I tried toughing it out but by the time I saw a doctor it was too late and they had to amputate my left arm above the elbow.' 

Approximately 30 percent of people carry staph infections - even in their nose, armpits, groin or buttocks without realizing it - but MRSA afflicts about two in every 100 people, according to health officials.

Athletes and those who receive inpatient medical care or have surgery or medical devices inserted in their body are at higher risk of MRSA infection.

If left untreated, the infection can invade the body's bloodstream and release poisonous toxins that kill up to one-fifth of infected patients.

Pro wrestler Romain Vezirian wrote: 'I hate that this happened to you. Going from being a huge fan of yours to sharing the ring with you remains the highlight of my career. We're all rooting for you.' 

Another pro, Jeremy Vain, also wrote encouraging words to Rave: 'Brother you have done so much to help so many people including me that had nothing to do with wrestling. Hope you know I'm praying you remember your ability to help others. You did it before, now it's just doing it a different way. I love you man. #Changelives.'

Rave claimed he withheld the knowledge about his legs due to an 'embarrassment' and that there were 'untrue things' being spread around that the pro was suffering from 'something else.' 

A few days before he posted the picture of him laying in his hospital bed, the wrestler had posted a hospital bill for more than $100,000, with room and board alone costing the retired star $52,500, and asked his fans for help with the cost. 

Rave posted an astonishing $103,000 medical bill on Twitter last week asking his fans for help 

Rave himself was 'wowed' by the shocking $103,314,77 bill for therapy, lab work, pharmacy charges, room and board, and the alleged $8.50 a day to 'use the 20 channel TV.' 

Other pro wrestlers rallied around the star, with many begging their own followers to 'help if you can.' 

'I'm really sorry this happened to you, you never failed any of us and you are an inspiration to all of us. The amount of things I've stolen from your work or knowledge you've given that I've quoted to others is priceless,' fellow pro wrestler Toby Farley wrote. 

'I don't know where the rumors started this was due to something else, but I hadn't been to shows for so long,' he wrote on Twitter. 'Pro Wrestling is all I ever loved. It sucks to think that the tribe I would have died for, would say untrue things about me.' 

A GoFundMe page was set up to help Rave after his arm was amputated in 2020, with several new donations flooding in after his recent announcement. 

So far the page has raised $16,115 of it's $20,000 goal. 

Rave was best known for his work with the Ring Of Honor - a live program featuring the 'best-in-ring action' and new styles that were 'developed by fresh, young stars that incorporates wrestling, mixed martial arts and high-flying.' 

The former pro-wrestler announced on his Instagram that he retired from the sport due to the amputation of his left arm in December 2020. He lost his arm to the same disease

Many other pro-wrestlers showed him love and support on Twitter and said he was an inspiration and that they were 'rooting' for him