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Kate Middleton reveals she spoke to her children about the Holocaust

The Duchess of Cambridge revealed she and Prince William had spoken to their children about the Holocaust. 

Kate, 38, told Bergen-Belsen survivor Mala Tribich that she felt it was important to educate Prince George, six, Princess Charlotte, four, and one-year-old Prince Louis about the atrocities once they are old enough to understand. 

'We were talking to the children about it earlier today,' Kate told Ms Tribich, 89, at a Holocaust Memorial Day event in London yesterday, according to Hello. 'But we have to be, you know, for a six year old… the interpretation...'

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The Duchess of Cambridge revealed she and William had spoken to their children about the Holocaust at an event mark the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz yesterday. Pictured, The couple with Olivia Marks-Woldman, CEO Holocaust Memorial Day Trust

Kate told Bergen-Belsen survivor Mala Tribich that she felt it was important to educate Prince George, six, Princess Charlotte, four, and one-year-old Prince Louis about the atrocities once they are old enough to understand. Pictured, as a family on the first day of school last year

Ms Tribich, who was born in Poland and forced into a ghetto before being sent to Ravensbruck concentration camp and then Bergen-Belsen, shared her story at an event to mark the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz at Central Hall in Westminster yesterday.

She met the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge following the hour-long service.

Speaking after the encounter, Ms Tribich said: 'She [the Duchess of Cambridge] said "Well I have told my children, I’ve made them aware". 

'I suppose she tells it in the measure that is applicable because young children, it’s very tricky (to tell them about it).'

Ms Tribich, who was born in Poland and forced into a ghetto before being sent to Ravensbruck concentration camp and then Bergen-Belsen, shared her story at the event yesterday. Pictured, Ms Tribich speaking with the Duchess of Cambridge following the service

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge lit candles during the service and William, 37, read a letter in praise of his great-grandmother Princess Alice, who saved a Jewish family from persecution.  

Kate appeared emotional as he read: 'When the persecution of the Jews by the Germans began, Princess Alice asked to be informed about the fate of the Cohen family. 

'Having been informed by friends and by her lady in waiting about the plight of Mrs Cohen and her young daughter, the Princess decided to offer her hospitality to the two ladies; in fact to hide them in her home despite the danger this entailed.

'The Princess put a small two-room apartment on the third floor at the disposal of Mrs. Cohen and her daughter. It was thanks to the courageous rescue of Princess Alice that the members of the Cohen family were saved. 

Kate lit a candle in memory of those killed in genocides and will then meet survivors following the ceremony at Central Hall in Westminster

Kate laughs with Holocaust survivor Yvonne Bernstein, who she photographed as part of her personal portraits of Holocaust survivors, after the service marking the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz 

Prince William is pictured shaking hands with Holocaust survivor Manfred Goldberg as Britain marks the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz

William read an extract from a letter written by a friend of his great-grandmother Princess Alice - famed for saving a Jewish family from the Holocaust - about her good deeds

'The members of the Cohen family left the residence three weeks after liberation, aware that by virtue of the Princess's generosity and bravery had spared them from the Nazis.

'The great-granddaughter of Rachel Cohen, Evy Cohen, said this two years ago: 'My family would not exist without the courageous act of Princess Alice. Her story of incredible courage must keep being told in her memory. 

'My generation, the past generation and the future generation are, and will eternally be, grateful to his great-grandmother Princess Alice for the great act of bravery, risking her own life to take in a family in need.' 

The duchess, who said it was 'our privilege' to meet survivors, described the ceremony as 'very poignant'.