United Kingdom

Grieving dad reveals daughter killed herself after discovering she'd been filmed showering at work

The father of a young woman who took her own life after a colleague filmed her showering at work reveals he's haunted by the thought he 'could have saved her' in a new Stacey Dooley documentary.

The man, who is not named, told how his daughter was 'tormented' by the thought the footage may be shared online and be seen by friends and family.

She began taking antidepressants and her fiancé moved into her flat to take care of her, but weeks later she threw herself from the 17th floor of a building on September 24 last year.

The woman was a victim of Molka, a digital sex crime rife in South Korea where hidden cameras are set up to capture pornographic footage of women without their knowledge, which is then shared on the internet. 

The father of a young woman who was driven to take her own life after a colleague filmed her showering at work reveals he's haunted by the thought he 'could have saved her' in a new Stacey Dooley documentary

Since 2010, Molka cases have jumped 600 per cent, with 6,800 cases reported in 2018.

In BBC Three's Stacey Dooley Investigates: Spycam Sex Criminals, the presenter speaks to victims and perpetrators of Molka in the country.

She travels to Suncheon in the south to speak to the late victim's family, who explain that their daughter was secretly filmed in the changing room of the hospital where she worked by a clinical pathologist in his thirties, who was caught in August last year.

Her father told how he would receive early morning phone calls from his daughter who was plagued by a recurring nightmare about the perpetrator.

The woman (pictured) was a victim of Molka, digital sex crime rife in South Korea. She began taking antidepressants and her fiancé moved into her flat to take care of her

'She kept dreaming it. At first my daughter took antidepressants, but she continued to have a hard time,' he told Stacey.

'The fear that someone she knows could have seen it, she was tortured by that thought.'

Speaking about the late night phone call he received informing them his daughter had jumped to her death, he broke down, admitting: 'I just thought she was badly injured. Well, I've lived 50 years, that feeling made me crazy, when I realised she was on the 17th floor, I can't bear to think about it.

'I was driving for two hours after the call. Her boyfriend saw her jump. We only heard about it, but he suffered the biggest trauma, so we keep telling him to forget our daughter, just to forget.'

The grieving father told how he would receive early morning phone calls from his daughter (pictured) who was plagued with a recurring nightmare about the perpetrator

The victim's mother added: 'The perpetrator fulfilled his own pleasure in the dark and slowly sucked the life from my daughter, who was living in pain. 

'How can we express her grief, to leave behind her loved ones and her family, how tormented she must have been, with sadness and pain.' 

The father told how he tried to remain pragmatic with his daughter, but she couldn't get past the humiliation of her ordeal and the potential harm it could cause her career. 

'I said, it's not like you were raped, and also you did nothing wrong so live with confidence, I just spoke pragmatically, but my daughter was asking about the humiliation,' he explained.

The victim's father told how he tried to remain pragmatic with his daughter, but she couldn't get past the humiliation of her ordeal and the potential harm it could cause her career

'She asked me to keep quiet about it so that's why I stood by and watched. I feel like I killed my daughter, that thought drives me insane. I had the chance to save her but I didn't, that drives me insane.'

The distraught parents are filmed clearing out their daughter's flat, preparing to burn her personal belongings at her Buddhist funeral, and show Stacey the contract for her wedding venue, where she was due to get married in January.

Clearly moved, Stacey replied: 'F*** I'm so sorry you've lost her.'

In a separate piece to camera, the presenter muses: 'Some people trivialise Molka crimes because we tend to associate it with weird loner types who take a couple of pictures up girls' skirts. You don't realise how harmful it is until you hear the extremes. it's horrendous.'

Stacey also travels to Seoul to meet a victim whose boyfriend filmed them having sex and threatened to share the videos with friends and family if she didn't stay in a relationship with him

Pornography is illegal in South Korea and has been blocked online since 2007, driving Molka underground.  

Stacey also travels to Seoul to meet a victim whose boyfriend filmed them having sex and threatened to share the videos with friends and family if she didn't stay in a relationship with him.  

The woman, whose identity was concealed, said: 'I felt really ashamed, I had to quit school and I couldn't work anymore. He destroyed everything. It would have been better if he'd just hit me and that was the end of it.

'The only person who watched the video was my ex. He told my friends that he had a sex video of me. He was even going to send the video to my father. 

Molka is a digital sex crime rife in South Korea where hidden cameras (like the one pictured) are set up to capture pornographic footage of women without their knowledge, which is then shared on the internet

'It would be shameful if a stranger saw it but at least that would be it. But if someone I knew or my family saw it, it would be social death.'  

Stacey also meets with a Molka user, who has been illegally filming women without their consent for five years and is being investigated by police after being caught twice.

He told her: 'If someone looked nice, if one girl's body was more attractive than another's, I'd take a photo because they were my type,' adding that this year alone he has taken approximately 8,000 pictures.

'I just collect them, I don't do anything with them, I've always been lonely and alone. Taking pictures and making them part of my collection, that's what gave me satisfaction.'

Stacey also meets with a Molka user, who has been illegally filming women without their consent for five years and is being investigated by police after being caught twice

Asked repeatedly by Stacey if he thinks it's wrong, he replied: 'Society and the law think it's wrong, and I'm aware of what they're saying, so I don't really want to deny them.

'With those pictures, I never uploaded them to the internet or put them on websites, or tried to make money from them or shared them to humiliate the person. None of that happened.

'I feel there's no direct harm in what I did, but indirectly from their point of view, there could be psychological damage.'

Stacey Dooley Investigates: Spycam Sex Criminals is available to watch now on BBC iPlayer. 

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