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Electric vehicle rebates of $3,000 in NSW are going to wealthier suburbs

Motorists in wealthy postcodes are more likely to have received a $5,540 subsidy for buying an electric car, new data shows.

Across Australia, fully electric vehicles have a minuscule 0.6 per cent market share.

But in New South Wales, the Coalition government is particularly keen to entice motorists into electric cars, ambitiously aiming for electric cars to comprise more than half of all sales in the state by 2031.

It is offering stamp duty exemptions for new and used electric vehicles worth up to $78,000 as part of its climate change plan.

That means they are spared paying up to $3,000 in charges that buyers of petrol and diesel cars still have to pay.

Motorists in wealthy postcodes are more likely to have received a $5,540 subsidy for buying an electric car, new data shows. For cars worth up to $68,750, there's a $3,000 rebate (pictured is a Tesla Model 3 selling from $59,900)

The policy also discriminates against tradies who don't have the choice of buying a fully-electric ute or van, with labourers and construction workers more likely to live in Sydney's western suburbs than the leafy north shore.

Electric car subsidies in NSW

REBATE 

The buyers of the first 25,000 electric or hydrogen cars bought since September 1 eligible for a $3,000 rebate 

Available for cars worth up to $68,750 

Applies for personal use and small business with less than 10 cars in state

STAMP DUTY EXEMPTION 

Electric cars worth up to $78,000 

Petrol and diesel cars still incur a $3 charge for every $100 up to $45,000 and $5 for every $100 over $45,000

The first 25,000 motorists who buy an electric car, worth up to $68,750, since September 1, will also qualify for a $3,000 rebate, following the passage of legislation in October.

With a stamp duty exemption of $2,537.50 and that $3,000 rebate, they are getting back up to $5,540 from the taxpayers. 

As of November 19, just 803 applications were received for the $3,000 rebate, with only 345 paid out so far, Department of Planning, Industry and Environment data showed.

Only 962 applications had been made for the stamp duty exemption, with 235 paid out.

One Nation's NSW leader Mark Latham, who asked a parliamentary question on notice, noted there was a a larger uptake for the subsidy in wealthier areas of Sydney's north shore and north-west.

'This shows how delusional NSW Treasurer Matt Kean has become in thinking he can save the planet with schemes like this,' he told Daily Mail Australia.

'Even from these early numbers, the inequity of the scheme is clear. 

'This was always going to be a cross-subsidy from the poorer parts of NSW to the wealthier suburbs.' 

The stamp duty exemption is overwhelmingly favouring wealthier suburbs. 

Crows Nest, on Sydney's lower north shore, had five recipients, compared with seven for Castle Hill in Sydney's north-west and another eight at nearby Kellyville.

In New South Wales, the Coalition government is particularly keen to entice motorists into electric cars, ambitiously aiming for electric cars to comprise more than half of all sales by 2031. It is offering stamp duty exemptions for new and used electric vehicles worth up to $78,000 (pictured is a Hyundai IONIQ 5 which in Australia sells for $71,900)

These areas all have household incomes well above the state average and are in safe Liberal Party seats. 

'It has an embarrassingly low-take up rate and in the money allocated, it's a clear subsidy for the wealthy – people who already have enough money to buy a $78,000 new car without support from taxpayers in Penrith, Nowra and Cessnock,' Mr Latham said.

The $3,000 rebate was also concentrated in wealthier areas with five recipients at Randwick and Coogee, six at Crows Nest, another five at Lane Cove on the lower north shore and five at St Ives on the upper north shore.

Sydney's Hills district also dominated the list with five at Baulkham Hills, five at Castle Hill and nine at Kellyville.

The inner west had five recipients at Breakfast Point. 

Western Sydney had a few on the list, with six at Olympic Park and Newington, and five at Constitution Hill and Girraween.

The Central Coast had five recipients at Bucketty and Calga.

One Nation's NSW leader Mark Latham, who asked a parliamentary question on notice, noted there was a a larger uptake for the subsidy in wealthier areas of Sydney's north shore and north-west

In the July Budget Premier Dominic Perrottet, when he was still treasurer, announced the first 25,000 people to buy an electric vehicle in the state would get a $3,000 rebate.

That means someone who buys a $59,900 Tesla Model 3 gets a $3,000 rebate and are spared from having to pay $2,095 in stamp duty. 

Someone buying a $71,900 Hyundai IONIQ 5 doesn't get the $3,000 rebate, because the car is more than $68,750, but they are spared paying $2,695 in stamp duty. 

In October, just 461 electric cars were sold in Australia during a month when 74,650 new vehicles left the showroom, Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries data showed.

Daily Mail Australia contacted Treasurer and Environment Minister Matt Kean for a comment.