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Dolly the Akubra girl's parents reveal the last question she asked her mum

Dolly Everett's parents have spoken candidly about the day their teenage daughter tragically took her own life.

The 14-year-old's shocking death in 2018 sparked an outpouring of grief across Australia and shone a spotlight on cyber-bullying in schools.

Dolly's parents said the warning signs were there after she asked her mother a difficult question, but the schoolgirl seemed 'good' the day of her suicide.

It was a hot Summer's day on January 3 at the family's Northern Territory cattle station. 

Dolly Everett's (pictured) shocking death in 2018 sparked an outpouring of grief across Australia and raised major concerns about cyber-bullying in schools

'She was good. We raced around doing jobs and had races on the bikes. We were fixing fences and stuff like that. It was a good day. It didn't really seem like anything was any different,' Dolly's older sister Meg told the Courier Mail. 

During the day Dolly asked her mother if she had plans for her to return to school.

Hours later, after sitting down with her family for a steak dinner with coleslaw and potato salad, Dolly ended her life.

Although her real name was Amy, Australia would come to know the sweet-looking country girl as Dolly.

She was the face of an Akubra hat advertising campaign that circulated every year at around Christmas time.

But Dolly's mental state unraveled after she was relentlessly bullied at a country boarding school.

It was revealed at the time she had been suspended for drinking, blackmailed to send candid pictures to a boy and brawled with other students.  

She was also the target of cruel verbal, physical and social media attacks. 

Dolly and her sister were both excited by the prospect of high school in 2015 after doing distance learning throughout primary school.    

'It was just little bits early in the piece and probably not enough to red flag I suppose,' her mother Kate said.

Dolly's mental state unraveled after she was relentlessly bullied at a country boarding school

Dolly Everett's parents Kate and Tick have spoken candidly about the day their teenage daughter tragically took her own life

Her father Tick said the bullying was like a snowball and progressively became worse.

'It started off as something that could have been fixed relatively easy and it just got away from everyone and once it got that momentum on, it just got out of hand. 

'Nobody really knew how to fix it or what to do and unfortunately it didn't go away.'

In the wake of their daughter's death, Kate and Tick launched and anti-bully organisation in Dolly's memory.

Dolly's Dream facilitates a cyber safety school programs and acts as a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves.

The organisation also provides bullying and wellbeing advice for parents whose children maybe in the grips of a similar situation. 

In 2018, the NSW government introduced legislation that would see cyberbullies face a maximum of five years' in jail for sending abusive messages online. 

The following year, her parents were named 2019 Australia's Local Hero of the Year. 

Dolly would have turned 18 and graduated high school at the end of this year. 

If you or anyone you know is in need of mental health support, you can contact Lifeline 13 11 14, Beyondblue 1300 22 4636 or Kids Helpline 1800 55 1800.  

Dolly (pictured) would have turned 18 and graduated high school at the end of this year

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