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Bushfire survivor used a dressing gown drenched in orange juice to survive a raging blaze

Scotty Mac doused himself in orange juice and hid in a bunker for three hours with his girlfriend and puppy

A man survived deadly bushfires with his girlfriend and puppy by dousing a dressing gown in orange juice. 

As deadly bushfires surrounded his New South Wales home, quick-thinking Scotty Mac made the life-saving decision to soak a dressing gown in orange juice and take refuge in makeshift bunker.

Breathing through the juice-soaked fabric to avoid inhaling ash and toxic fumes, the trio hid in the tiny bunker for three hours while the flames ravaged their property. 

Their lucky escape inspired friend and fellow bushfire survivor Bruce Walker to post some lesser-known survival tips on social media. 

The man's blunt advice detailed a range of scenarios, including what clothes to wear, how to avoid suffocation and what to do if you live on a ridge or a narrow and forested road.

'If you live on an upslope, ridge, or narrow forested road, get the f*** out. No help will come.'

The bunker where Scotty Mac survived a deadly blaze

Mr Walker said he knew people who chose to stay in those areas but couldn't escape later because trees had fallen and blocked the exits.

The Royal Fire Service was unable to help in case they became trapped. 

He also said protecting a home with 1200 litres of water in an RFS standard Cat7 hose would be 'like p***ing into a hurricane' on a ridge. 

The social media user said if you're unable to escape, make a hole and cover yourself with wet sheets. 

'Please fill your bathtub before it hits - water tanks will melt real fast and you'll have no water.

'The thing that might make the difference between life and death could be as simple as layers of wet clothing, a low sheltered concrete corner, some sheets of tin and wet sheets or blankets to protect from radiant heat.'

Bruce Walker posted life-saving bushfire tips on social media 

He also have tips to avoid suffocation and warned people not to die defending their homes.

'Remember, fire can move up to 400km per hour uphill. If you change your mind and live on a ridge, you are quite likely f*****. Don't die for stuff.'

Mr Walker explained how how he used his own advice to survive the 'hellstorm' in the northern NSW town of Diehard on Friday.

'We were lucky enough to have a small Honda pump plus a Cat 7 [hose] but our tank was on fire several times - if that had gone, we'd be gone,' he said. 

'If you're not going to be able to save that tank, forget about it. You're going to lose your house, get out now.'

The blaze claimed two lives and 53 homes out of 73. 

Mr Walker survived a deadly blaze in Diehard, NSW

'I don't think the fire will travel 400km/h - I guess that's meant to say 40km/h in some extreme wind uphill,' one person said.

'Nope, I meant 400km/h. Every ten degrees of slope doubles the ground speed of fire,' Mr Walker replied. 

'Wet clothing plus fire can mean boiling skin,' said another commenter.

'People have boiled alive in pools and water tanks but radiant heat will nail you in seconds if you aren't covered. This is purely a technique for surviving short-term,' he responded. 

Many others commented and shared their gratitude.

'Very good advice Bruce. You've touched on things some probably wouldn't have thought of until too late,' said one person. 

'You're a legend! Thanks for the tips' said another. 

BRUCE WALKER'S BUSHFIRE ADVICE 

[Sic] I just want to post a few survival tips for those about to be hit by fire - any more experienced RFS types, please feel free to correct me.

1. If you live on an upslope, ridge, or narrow forested road, get the f*** out - no help will come.

People here who stayed then changed their minds later, couldn't escape because trees fell within minutes and blocked exit routes.

RFS were either unable to get in, or were forbidden due to extreme risk of being cut off themselves - 1200 litres of water in a Cat7 is like pissing into a hurricane, especially if you're up on a ridge.

2. If actually caught and unable to escape. dig in and cover with - DRY WOOLEN BLANKETS.

Please fill your bathtub before it hits - water tanks will melt real fast and you'll have no water - the thing that MIGHT make the difference between life and death could be as simple as layers of wool blankets, a low sheltered concrete corner, some sheets of tin and wet sheets or blankets to protect from radiant heat.

I previously mentioned wet clothing or sheets - this is inferior to a wool blanket and you will boil alive - but - if nothing wool is available, it's way better for a last minute run through fire lasting a few seconds. synthetic clothing is also bad. wool or cotton long sleeves and leather boots if possible.

Remember that the only safe area to run to is often INTO an area already burnt - you can also survive by having a shallow grave and laying in that under wet stuff and tin, breathe through a wet cloth to avoid suffocation - you'll collapse real f***ing fast without oxygen and remember also, many houses are made with plastics and toxic gas-causing materials so.... yeah.... stay safe out there and honestly, if you live on a ridge or uphill slope... run now. Your life is worth more than stuff.

3. If you think you can defend, don't forget to protect your water tank and exposed poly lines - if that goes, you're f*****.

people on gravity feed systems, this is your weak point - we were lucky enough to have a small honda pump plus a Cat 7 - but our tank was on fire several times - if that had gone, we'd be gone. remember this, especially if on a bush block with some tank uphill off in the scrub - if you're not gonna be able to save that tank, forget about it. you're going to lose your house, get out now.

remember, fire can move up to 400km per hour uphill. if you change your mind and live on a ridge, you are quite likely f*****. don't die for stuff. escape, and we can hunt down the corrupt f***s who made this happen later. channel that anger to the ones who sold us out and gave away our water and our future to line their own f***ing pockets.

stay safe, straya. you voted for this - don't blame the greens, blame the pricks who stopped the rivers flowing and dried this continent out while giving away free unlimited water to mining. 

please share, no s*** this might save lives. <3

[I am a survivor of the recent hellstorm @ Wytaliba, DIEHARD NSW, Australia - Friday 8 november 2019 - 52 homes gone out of 73 - this is the new normal]

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