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At least 26 people are dead and 16 missing after powerful Typhoon Hagibis ripped through Japan

At least 26 people are dead and 16 missing after the powerful Typhoon Hagibis ripped through Japan triggering deadly landslides and flooding rivers, with hundreds of homes evacuated.

The destruction forced Rugby World Cup organisers to cancel the third match of the tournament, though the key Japan-Scotland clash will go ahead.

By Sunday morning, the significantly weakened storm had moved back off land, but serious flooding was reported in central Japan's Nagano, where a burst levee sent water from the Chikuma river gushing into residential neighbourhoods, flooding homes up to the second floor. 

Yasuhiro Yamaguchi, an emergency official in Nagano city said: 'Overnight, we issued evacuation orders to 427 households, 1,417 individuals.' 

The government has deployed 27,000 troops and other rescue workers to take part in operations after some 376,000 homes were left without electricity, and 14,000 without running water.

Hagibis smashed into the main Japanese island of Honshu around 7:00 pm (1000 GMT) Saturday as one of the most violent typhoons in recent years, with wind gusts of up to 134 miles per hour. 

Scroll down for video. 

The government has deployed 27,000 troops and other rescue workers to take part in operations after some 376,000 homes were left without electricity, and 14,000 without running water (pictured: submerged houses in Nagano province after the Chikuma River broke its banks)

A baseball stadium is flooded after Typhoon Hagibis, in Kawasaki, near Tokyo on Sunday, around 7.3million people were told to evacuate as the storm made landfall on Saturday

A Shinkansen bullet train rail yard is seen flooded due to heavy rains caused by Typhoon Hagibis in Nagano, central Japan

Buildings lie in ruins today after they were hit by a tornado shortly before the arrival of Typhoon Hagibis, one of the worst typhoons to strike Japan in decades

An aerial picture shows Shinkansen trains in a flooded area in Nagano on Sunday after Typhoon Hagibis, forecast to be the nation's most powerful in six decades, made landfall on Honshu island on Saturday

A local resident is rescued by a Japan Self-Defence Force helicopter from residential areas flooded by the Chikuma river in Nagano, central Japan on Sunday

Houses and vehicles sit partially submerged in floodwater following the passage of Typhoon Hagibis on Sunday

An elderly woman gestures as she was evacuated along with others from a nursing home flooded by Typhoon Hagibis, before being moved to another facility in Nagano on Sunday

At least 26 people are dead and 16 missing after the powerful Typhoon Hagibis ripped through Japan triggering deadly landslides and flooding rivers, with hundreds of homes evacuated 

Houses are submerged after Typhoon Hagibis hit the area in Ashikaga, north of Tokyo, Japan. Some 376,000 homes were left without electricity, and 14,000 without running water

In this aerial image, a rescue operation is underway at a landslide site triggered by Typhoon Hagibis on Sunday morning

Well before making landfall, the outer bands of the storm claimed their first victim, a driver whose van was flipped over in the strong gusts.

Several more deaths were confirmed Saturday night, including a man killed in a landslide and another pulled from a flooded home.

A local resident is rescued from a house submerged in flood water on Sunday

And the toll continued to rise as the full scale of the disaster became clearer Sunday morning, with bodies recovered from submerged cars and landslides across several regions of the country. 

News footage showed a rescue helicopter hovering in a flooded area in Nagano prefecture where an embankment of the Chikuma River broke, and streams of water were continuing to spread over residential areas.

The helicopter plucked those stranded on the second floor of a home submerged in muddy waters.

A stretch of Fukushima, in the city of Date, was also flooded with only rooftops of residential homes visible in some areas, and rescuers paddled in boats to get people out. Parts of nearby Miyagi prefecture were also under water.

The Tama River, which runs by Tokyo, overflowed its banks, flooding homes and other buildings in the area.

Authorities warned of a risk of mudslides. Among the reported deaths were those whose homes were buried in landslides. Other fatalities included people who got swept away by raging rivers.

Mr Suga said recovery was on its way. Some 376,000 homes were without electricity, and 14,000 homes lacked running water, he said.

Boats as well as helicopters were sent to the flooded areas, while rescue crew dug through dirt elsewhere to try to get people out from homes buried by landslides.

Landing restrictions at Tokyo's Narita and Haneda airports were lifted but more than 800 flights were cancelled for the day, NHK said, as were some Shinkansen bullet train services to the worst-hit areas. 

Fire department workers evacuate residents today using a rubber dinghy from a flooded area in Date, Fukushima prefecture

Vast areas are covered in flood water on Sunday in Kawagoe, Saitama prefecture, Japan, as the death toll continues to rise

Around 7.3 million people were placed under non-compulsory evacuation orders and more than 30 were injured after Typhoon Hagibis hit the south coast on Saturday

A nursing care home is half submerged by deep flood waters in Kawagoe in the Saitama prefecture around 20 miles north of Tokyo

The storm claimed the first of two victims hours before arriving on the coast, when strong winds from its outer bands flipped a car in Chiba east of Tokyo and killed the driver

People recover items next to their house after it was damaged by a tornado shortly before the arrival of Typhoon Hagibis in Chiba, central eastern Japan

Canada rugby players praised for joining clean-up efforts after World Cup clash with Namibia is called off due to typhoon

Canadian rugby players have helped with recovery efforts after landslides and flooding cancelled their match against Namibia.

The Rugby World Cup match in Kamaishi was called off after Super Typhoon Hagibis saw torrential rain and tornado-like winds hit large parts of Japan. 

With the Pool B match cancelled, Canada's players instead joined in with recovery efforts around the stadium.  

Footage soon circulated online of the players pitching in, as the devastation caused by the typhoon became apparent.

Sporting their training kit, the players took to the streets to join locals in moving debris from streets and restoring order after the brutal weather conditions.

Spades were used to bring up large swathes of mud which had been carried down the streets, before placing the mess into bags for removal.

Authorities lifted rain warnings for the Kanto region around Tokyo, where stores reopened and many train lines resumed operations, but they warned there was still the risk of rivers in eastern Japan overflowing and inflicting fresh damage.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe convened an emergency meeting and sent the minister in charge of disaster management to the affected areas.

'I extend my condolences for all those who lost their lives and offer my sympathy to all those impacted by Typhoon No.19 (Hagibis),' Abe said.

'With respect to blackouts, water outage and suspension of transportation services, we intend to exert all-out efforts for the earliest recovery ... we ask the public to remain vigilant of landslides and other hazards,' he said.

Several train service in the Tokyo area resumed, although others were undergoing safety checks and were expected to restart later on Sunday.  

Some seven million people were told to evacuate homes in Japan as Typhoon Hagibis, forecast to be the nation's most powerful in six decades, made landfall on Honshu island.

Around 7.3 million people were placed under non-compulsory evacuation orders and more than 30 were injured after Typhoon Hagibis hit the south coast on Saturday.

Even before making landfall, Hagibis caused enormous disruption, forcing the cancellation of two Rugby World Cup matches, and grounding all flights in the Tokyo region, but the Japanese Grand Prix is set to go ahead. 

Canada's national rugby union team player Peter Nelson and other teammates help remove mud inside a house at a flooded area, caused by Typhoon Hagibis in Kamaishi, Iwate prefecture

Canadian rugby players joining in the relief effort today which required as many bodies as possible in order to shift the volume of mess

Fire department workers are seen evacuating residents while soldiers take part in rescue efforts in a flooded area in Kawagoe, Saitama prefecture on Sunday

Workers standing waist-deep in flood water check the conditions of their office after the passage of Typhoon Hagibis in Nagano

Surging waves generated by Typhoon Hagibis hit against a breakwater at a port in the town of Kiho on Saturday - as part of the storm which has left hundreds of thousands without power in the worst effected areas

Two people walk through cables which fell on the road in Ichihara, Chiba Prefecture, during the storm. The JMA has issued a statement about the importance to 'take action that can help save your lives' as auto plants to the country's convenience stores, usually open 24 hours a day, shut their doors. One man was killed in Chiba, east of Tokyo, when his car overturned

The storm, which the government said could be the strongest to hit Tokyo since 1958, brought record-breaking rainfall in many areas, including the popular resort town of Hakone, which was hit with 939.5 mm (37 inches) of rain over 24 hours

An evacuee with a dog is rescued after the city is hit by Typhoon Hagibis, in Motomiya, Fukushima prefecture, northern Japan

World Rugby has urged supporters not to travel unless it is 'absolutely necessary'. Japan's World Cup players were yesterday pictured wading through a flooded Tokyo stadium, but their match with Scotland will now go ahead. 

It crashed into Japan's main Honshu island at 7pm before barrelling into Izu, a peninsula southwest of Tokyo, the Japan Meteorological Agency said. 

'Be ready for rainfall of the kind that you have never experienced,' said meteorological agency official Yasushi Kajihara, adding that areas usually safe from disasters may prove vulnerable.

'Take all measures necessary to save your life,' he said. 

A Japan Self-Defense Force helicopter hovers above submerged residential area after an embankment of the Chikuma River broke because of Typhoon Hagibis

Rubble covers the ground in Ichihara, China, after winds reached 90mph and harsh weather ripped through homes 

A damaged vehicle is upturned and a house was smashed after a tornado caused by Typhoon Hagibis hit Ichihara. The Meteorological Agency has issued its highest level of warning for rain for most of central and eastern Japan

Firefighters patrol on a flooded road due to heavy rains caused by Typhoon Hagibis at Ota ward in Tokyo. Another 20 inches is forecast for the Tokyo area in the next 25 hours, according to the Japan Meteorological Agency 

Japan's national rugby union team players wade through floodwater at Chichibu Stadium in Tokyo

World Rugby has urged supporters not to travel unless it is 'absolutely necessary'. Japan's World Cup players were yesterday pictured wading through a flooded Tokyo stadium

The storm claimed the first of two victims hours before arriving on the coast, when strong winds from its outer bands flipped a car in Chiba east of Tokyo and killed the driver.

Four people died in Chiba, Gunma, Kanagawa and Fukushima prefectures surrounding Tokyo, public broadcaster NHK said. Among them was a man in his 60s who was found with no vital signs in a flooded apartment in Kawasaki.

In Gotemba, west of Tokyo, emergency services said they had rescued one man who fell into a swollen canal but was still searching for a second man. 

In Fukushima, Tokyo Electric Power Co reported irregular readings from sensors monitoring water in its Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant overnight. The plant was crippled by a 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

In parts of Fukushima and Nagano prefectures, heavy rain caused rivers to flood their banks, submerging houses and rice paddies and forcing some people to climb onto their roofs for safety. 

Houses along the Chikuma river in Nagano were nearly under water and at least one person was rescued from the roof of a house by helicopter, NHK said. Part of a road was swept away in flooding.  

Cars submerged in water in a residential area hit by the dramatic typhoon in Ise, central Japan. It has been called the worst Japan's worst typhoon in the past six decades, leaving many locals stranded and dependent on shelters and emergency rations

Pedestrians were seen wading through flooded roads as the powerful storm took hold in Japan and around 7.3 million people have been told to evacuate

The skies above Japan turned pink and purple before typhoon Hagibi hit the country, causing mass devastation

Many rivers were close to breaching their banks by Saturday afternoon local time. A sign is pictured partially submerged as the Tama River floods during Typhoon Hagibis. Resident Hidetsugu Nishimura said they have 'never seen anything like this'

The storm, which the government said could be the strongest to hit Tokyo since 1958, brought record-breaking rainfall in many areas, including the popular resort town of Hakone, which was hit with 939.5 mm (37 inches) of rain over 24 hours.

Hagibis, which means 'speed' in the Philippine language Tagalog, made landfall on Japan's main island of Honshu on Saturday evening.

By early evening, tens of thousands were in shelters and receiving emergency rations and blankets, though a 5.7-magnitude quake that rattled the Tokyo area did little to calm nerves.

The US Geological Survey said the earthquake was centered in the ocean off the coast of Chiba, near Tokyo, and was fairly deep at 59.5 kilometers. 

Major shinkansen bullet trains from Tokyo would begin on schedule Sunday, NHK said, while the Tokyo subway system was also operating.

A man, carrying food to be distributed to residents trapped in their homes, wades through floodwaters in the aftermath of Typhoon Hagibis in Shibata district, Miyagi Prefecture

An aerial picture shows colossal swathes of territory in Kawagoe, Saitama prefecture, submerged in flood waters on Sunday

A resident walks on a flooded road in Date, Fukushima prefecture on Sunday after the storm cleared and headed back out to sea on Sunday

Wales and Uruguay observe a minutes silence for the victims of Typhoon Hagibis during the 2019 Rugby World Cup match at the Kumamoto Stadium, Kumamoto

One expert, Nobuyuki Tsuchiya, director of the Japan Riverfront Research Center, had earlier told Reuters that further flooding could occur as several surrounding prefectures began releasing water from dams, letting it flow downstream.

About 1.5 million people in Tokyo live below sea level.

Before the heavy downpours and strong winds pounded Tokyo and the surrounding areas, residents captured pictures of the bright pink and purple sky.

The eerie phenomenon, which often precedes or follows a major storm, is the result of 'scattering'.

This happens when molecules and small particles in the atmosphere influence the direction of light, causing the light to scatter.

Heavy storms wash away the larger particles which have absorbed more light and scattered wavelengths more evenly. This makes the colours of the sky appear more vivid. 

The Japan Meteorological Agency issued the highest alert level for 12 prefectures, warning of potential for once in decades rain totals. It lifted the alerts early Sunday. 

High waves hit Shirahama on Saturday as Japan's worst in six decades makes landfall - and the storm has caused the delay of Japanese Grand Prix qualifiers scheduled for Saturday and cancellation of two Rugby World Cup matches

A view of an overflowing Sumida River on Saturday as Typhoon Hagibis approached Tokyo. It is believed that officials will make a decision about whether Scotland and Japan's Rugby World Cup match will go through tomorrow only until the morning, as a result of the storm which has delayed Japanese Grand Prix qualifiers

An emergency vehicle drives through debris on a flooded road during the evacuation of guests at the Osen Sanso Nakamura hotel in Sengokuhara, in Nakone province

Cars pass by at Ginza shopping district in the pouring rain due to Typhoon Hagibis in Tokyo. It crashed into Japan's main Honshu island at 7pm before barrelling into Izu, a peninsula southwest of Tokyo, the Japan Meteorological Agency said

A woman tries to catch a taxi in the pouring rain as Typhoon Hagibis hits Tokyo. The country is hit by around 20 typhoons a year, though the capital is not usually badly affected

The Japan Meteorological Agency warned of dangerously heavy rainfall in Tokyo and surrounding areas, including Gunma and Saitama. Most shockingly Kanagawa has seen 70mm of rain over 24 hours

'Take all measures necessary to save your life,' meteorological agency official Yasushi Kajihara said. Tokyo Disneyland was closed, while Ginza department stores (pictured) and smaller shops throughout Tokyo were shuttered

Shopkeepers taped up their windows in Hamamatsucho, Tokyo  to prevent them from shattering (pictured). And more broadly, Nippon Airways and Japan Airlines grounded most domestic and international flights at the Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya airports

Hagibis was advancing northwestward with maximum sustained winds of 162 kilometers per hour on Saturday and a 5.7 earthquake hit the Kanto region around 6.22pm local time which did little to calm nerves

Just last month, another strong storm, Typhoon Faxai, destroyed or damaged 30,000 houses in Chiba, east of Tokyo, and caused extensive power outages.

The capital's main airports, Haneda and Narita, stopped flights from landing and connecting trains were suspended, forcing the cancellation of more than a thousand flights.

Many people in and around Tokyo took shelter in temporary evacuation facilities early, before the worst of the storm arrived.

Before the heavy downpours and strong winds pounded Tokyo and the surrounding areas, residents captured pictures of the bright pink and purple sky.

The eerie phenomenon, which often precedes or follows a major storm, is the result of 'scattering'.

This happens when molecules and small particles in the atmosphere influence the direction of light, causing the light to scatter.

Heavy storms wash away the larger particles which have absorbed more light and scattered wavelengths more evenly. This makes the colours of the sky appear more vivid.

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