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Apples and margarine prices surge 20% as rising food inflation hits Brits' pockets

Consumers pockets are set to be hit harder as inflation causes the cost of everyday groceries from apples, to sausages to margarine, to surge in price.

New data from the Office for National Statistics shows prices for some of the most basic goods that Brits fill their trolleys up with have skyrocketed in the past 12 months.

Apples and margarine have both seen huge increases, both up 20 per cent. A typical 500g tub will now cost upwards of £1.60, while a bag of apples topped £2.35. 

As the cost of everyday groceries continues to soar, Brits are facing the crunch from all corners as energy bills, petrol prices and rising inflation continue to cripple consumers' spending power.

Families are now on the cusp of the biggest spending squeeze in nearly a decade, despite some supermarket bosses trying in vain to protect shoppers from the worst of the price rises.

New data from the Office for National Statistics shows prices for some of the most basic goods that Brits fill their trolleys up with have skyrocketed in the past 12 months 

Apples and margarine have both seen huge increases, both up 20 per cent. A typical 500g tub will now cost upwards of £1.60, while a bag of apples will top £2.35.

After a steady steam of falling food prices, food inflation surged from 0.3% in August to 0.8% in September as retailers battled supply shortages and higher costs.

That means a standard pack of pork sausages jumped up from £4.87 to £5.16 per kilogram in the space of a month.

Meanwhile, pears soared up 16% to £2.37, while a bag of apples hit £2.35 after rising by a fifth.

Prices are rising at the fastest pace in at least a quarter of a century as businesses pass on the costs of labour, materials, shipping and energy to consumers. 

A standard pack of pork sausages jumped up from £4.87 to £5.16 per kilogram in the space of a month, while pears soared to £2.37 (up 16%)

New data from the Office for National Statistics breaks down how skyrocketing prices of basic goods have seen the cost of living surge throughout 2021

The average household spent £277 a month on food expenses, but the latest inflation reading suggests this could increase to £285 a month this year. 

Analysis by MailOnline of prices compared to those in March 2020 found many staple goods have gone up in cost include mushrooms, spring onions, cabbage, salmon, soup, kiwi fruit, apples and mineral water. 

Among the biggest price rises are eggs, sausages, fizzy drinks, fruit and bottled water. 

The average price of a pint in the pub across the country could soon pass £4, the ONS has also said. 

Experts are warning food inflation is set to carry on well into the new year, compounding a Christmas season of woe for thousands of families.

Train fares, telephone and internet bills, and other day-to-day expenses are also increasing, while Boris Johnson's health and social care levy means workers will have to pay an extra 1.25 percentage point in tax from next year. 

Investment group Shore Capital warned prices could jump as high as 6% through 2022.

Families are now on the cusp of the biggest spending squeeze in nearly a decade as bills and prices rise relentlessly, with household bills expected to rise by more than £1,500

News of soaring food inflation comes amid a 'perfect storm' of price and tax hikes, as Brits already face the crunch with surging energy and gas bills

Analysis of price rises in the last year shows the cost of a second-hand car has risen more than £1,600, a tank of fuel is up more than £10 and the price of a pint of beer is creeping close to £4

Clive Black, a Shore Capital research analyst, told the Mirror: 'Some suppliers that raised prices in the summer are already necessarily coming back more given the inflationary forces. 

'With rising demands from supply chains around animal welfare... safety, sustainability and well-being, in future years shoppers will have to pay more for their food.' 

Meanwhile, food wholesaler BidFood has warned that it is experiencing 'significant' supply pressures and struggling to recruit HGV drivers, blaming the issues on the pandemic and Brexit.

Supermarkets are said to be having to concentrate on moving fresh products rather than many dry goods because of a lack of hauliers amid the lorry driver shortage.

Earlier this year, pig farmers started culling livestock amid warnings from food firms the drastic measures will hit key ingredients.

And meat industry leaders say a lack of skilled butchers means abattoirs are refusing to accept pigs for slaughter, leading to fewer pork products and reduced choice.