United Kingdom

Adenomyosis sufferer whose period cramps feel like 'barbed wire in her womb' praises new device

A model plagued by agonising menstrual cramps for over 30 years has hailed a new device which blocks period pain 'life-changing'.

Nalintha Lala, 45, from London, was initially diagnosed with endometriosis after struggling to conceive for several years, but further tests later revealed she was actually suffering from adenomyosis. 

She told how her symptoms were so severe she felt like she had 'barbed wire in her womb' and worried every month about the impact her period would have on her work.

It was while on a shoot for a TV shopping channel that a colleague suggested she try Livia, a small device priced at £199 which transmits unique micro-pulses to stimulate nerves and block the signals that cause painful cramps.  

Nalintha Lala, 45, from London#, was plagued by agonising menstrual cramps for over 30 years - but she claims a new gadget that blocks period pain is 'life-changing'

Nalintha now uses the gadget, which can be worn discreetly under outfits, for two days every month and feels like she's got her life back.

Speaking to FEMAIL, she explained: 'I've found that using the device either removes the pain completely or reduces it to a level where I feel I can cope both physically and mentally. 

'The fact that I'm not walking around in pain helps me immensely and I don't feel as anxious as I know that I will be able to cope much better with everyday situations and tasks.'

Nalintha, who started her periods at the age of 10, said she has experienced debilitating pain during menstruation for as long as she can remember.

Nalintha, who started her periods at the age of 10, said she has experienced debilitating pain during menstruation for as long as she can remember

Livia, a small device priced at £199 which transmits unique micro-pulses to stimulate nerves and block the signals that cause painful cramps

'The pain was - and still is - often excruciating, to the point where I couldn't do much else but to curl up in a ball willing it to end,' she recalled. 

'I was made to believe that this was something I had to tolerate and that being in that much pain every month was normal. Something in retrospect I realise just isn't true or acceptable.

'After my husband and I tried and failed to conceive for a number of years, I was diagnosed originally with endometriosis and during further exploratory treatment, at around the age of 38, I was diagnosed with adenomyosis.'

Adenomyosis is a condition where the cells of the lining of the womb - endometrium - are found in the muscle wall of the womb.

After trying to conceive for a number of years, Nalintha was diagnosed originally with endometriosis and during further exploratory treatment, at around the age of 38, she was diagnosed with adenomyosis

Around one in 10 women will have adenomyosis and symptoms can include severe period pain, lower abdominal pressure, bloating and can result in heavy periods. 

What is adenomyosis and how does it differ to endometriosis? 

Adenomyosis occurs when the cells that normally line the uterus also grow in the layer of muscle in the wall of the uterus. It can cause enlargement of the uterus and heavy periods.

Endometriosis occurs when some of the tissue similar to the lining of the uterus (womb), called the endometrium, grows outside of the uterus.

Adenomyosis is only seen in women in their reproductive years because it requires the hormone oestrogen to grow. It eventually goes away after menopause when oestrogen production drops.  

Some symptoms include: heavy periods, painful periods, pain during sex, bleeding between periods and tiredness from the anaemia caused by blood loss. 

Endometriosis is a progressive, chronic condition, the cause of which is not known. 

Some symptoms include: heavy periods or irregular bleeding, abdominal or pelvic pain before and during a period, when having sex or going to the toilet, bleeding between periods, bleeding from bladder or bowel, changes in urination or bowel movements, bloating, tiredness, moody, and infertility. 

Source: Health Direct 

Nalintha said: 'I unfortunately suffer with the entire spectrum of symptoms and for me, the pain is unbearable. 

'I would describe it like the feeling you would imagine if you had barbed wire in your womb.

'Throughout my adult life, I can honestly say that the pain I feel due to my condition around the time of my period has affected every aspect of my life. 

'I am a freelance model and there have been times when the mere thought that my period might coincide with an assignment has caused huge amounts of anxiety. 

'It evokes thoughts like, "Can I be professional when I'm in this much pain?" - and sometimes I've doubted that I'll be able to last the day.'

Nalintha was introduced to Livia by someone who'd seen her battle through her severe pain on numerous occasions on set, and she decided to give it a go. 

'It's really discreet,' she said. 'Importantly, it's drug free - I dread to think how many painkillers I've taken over the years. For me, it has been life-changing.' 

Livia uses technology based on the gate control theory to 'switch off' period pain, and works through electrode gel pads attached to the lower abdomen. When the nerves are stimulated, the nerve gate is closed, preventing pain signals from reaching the brain and being felt.

The device transmits unique pulses to keep the nerves 'busy' and block the signals that cause pain. Once Livia is on, you'll start to feel relief within 30-60 seconds.

It's proved so popular with customers that the brand had a waiting list of over 4,000 people off the back of its glowing reviews. 

Clinical studies have shown that 90 per cent of participants using Livia reported pain reduction, 59 per cent reported moderate relief, 31 per cent reported complete pain relief and 32 per cent said Livia provided significantly faster pain relief than drugs. 

Nalintha added: 'As women, I feel we need to be having these important conversations and acknowledging that pain is something we don't have to put up with. 

Nalintha added: 'As women, I feel we need to be having these important conversations and acknowledging that pain is something we don't have to put up with'

'It's important for us to know that there are drug-free options out there that can help us if we need it.'  

Dr Sarah Jarvis commented: 'For many women, painkillers or hormonal treatments can offer relief, but for a non-drug alternative, Livia harnesses the principles of well proven pain relief for childbirth and joint pain to offer rapid, safe relief for period pain and endometriosis.

'The idea of the gate theory of pain has been around for decades. Pain from different parts of your body travels to your central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord), leading to signals to tell you something hurts. If the nerves that carry pain signal are kept occupied, they can’t transmit pain signals. That’s the basis on which TENS machines – widely used for labour pain and muscle and joint pain – are based.

'Livia is based on the same principles, however it uses micro-pulses to keep the central nervous system "occupied" – reducing or completely blocking their ability to receive signals from your womb about menstrual pain. And there’s evidence that these micro-pulses also activate the body’s natural pain control response by releasing endorphins – the body’s "feel good" hormone. This suppresses the pain further.' 

Livia is currently on sale for £125.99. For more information visit https://uk.mylivia.com/ 

Football news:

Laporta on the election: For Messi to stay, the president must appear as soon as possible. The postponement only hurts
Schalke and Ajax have agreed to move Huntelaar
Zidane on the criticism: It doesn't matter if I'm tired or not. Not only does the coach work, there is a lot behind the club
Barcelona to challenge Messi's suspension for hitting Athletic player on the head
Wenger on Ozil at Fenerbahce: He needs a warm environment. He always chooses the right decision in the game, and this is brilliant
Til Schweiger's company made a sugar documentary about Schweinsteiger: not a single acute topic and no Lama at all
Zidane on Jovic: It's hard to play in Real life. There is a lot of competition here, but it's not the coach's fault