New Zealand
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Unregistered Motor Vehicle Seller Convicted And Fined

A Tauranga man has been fined $3,500 after he was convicted of breaching the Motor Vehicle Sales Act 2003 (MVSA).

The unregistered motor vehicle seller was convicted after a Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) investigation charged the man with one count of trading motor vehicles whilst being unregistered.

The Defendant, who had previously been registered as motor vehicle trader, pleaded guilty and was subsequently sentenced at the Auckland District Court to a $3,500 fine and ordered to pay $130 court costs.

Commenting on the sentencing, the Registrar of Motor Vehicle Traders, Duncan Connor said:

“Having previously been a registered motor vehicle trader, the Defendant was aware that selling eight vehicles in 12-months while unregistered, breached the Motor Vehicle Sales Act.

“The risk is that consumers could face significant financial losses when purchasing from an unregistered motor vehicle trader as they are not subject to the checks that apply to those who are registered.

“I would strongly encourage anyone considering purchasing a car to check whether the person or company they are purchasing from is a registered motor vehicle trader on the online register.”

Registered motor vehicle traders have been assessed as being suitable to be registered, and they must comply with obligations under the MVSA, Consumer Guarantees Act 1993, and Fair Trading Act 1986.

To find out whether you need to become a registered motor vehicle trader, and if you're eligible to register please visit https://motortraders.mbie.govt.nz/becoming-a-registered-trader/who-needs-to-register/.

Consumers can check whether the person they are purchasing from is a registered motor vehicle trader by accessing the public register at https://www.motortraders.govt.nz/.

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