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Warren says she'd be youngest woman president if elected

Elizabeth Warren joked that she would automatically become the “youngest woman ever inaugurated” to serve as president if she is elected in 2020. 

The Massachusetts senator quipped about the issues of both age and gender as Democratic presidential candidates were asked at Thursday night's debate whether either could factor into voters’ decisions in choosing a nominee to take on Donald Trump in the general election.

The 70-year-old presidential hopeful was responding to debate moderator Tim Alberta from Politico, who noted she would be the oldest president inaugurated if she wins in 2020. "I'd also be the youngest woman ever inaugurated", she said.

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The senator's response was met with immediate cheers from the crowd and a standing ovation from audience members.

Race also took the debate stage towards the end of the first hour, as questions of diversity were posed to candidates.

Asked why he was the lone minority candidate on the debate stage, Andrew Yang said most people of colour don’t donate to political campaigns because they lack the disposable income.

Mr Yang, who is Asian American, lamented the absence of Kamala Harris — who suspended her campaign earlier this month despite qualifying for the debate — and Cory Booker, who Mr Yang predicted would return to the debate stage.

He then turned the issue into a pitch for his candidacy, telling moderators his proposed “freedom dividend”, which would give every American $1,000 a month, would “guarantee” he would not be the only minority candidate on stage.

Amy Klobuchar was asked what she would say to white Americans uncomfortable with the idea of becoming a racial minority. She responded that the country must “strive for a more perfect union,” which means including people of color in economic progress and fighting voter suppression.

Bernie Sanders meanwhile said climate change is also part of addressing racial inequality, and said all candidates “have an obligation” to speak to issues such as criminal justice, the economy and the environment. particularly in the absence of candidates of colour.

The Associated Press contributed to this report