Wintry weather is set to blast the UK for days as thousands of Brits remain in darkness after Storm Arwen wreaked havoc on power supplies.

Snow is likely as temperatures plunge into the chilly single-digits and strong gales sweep across northern and Scottish regions until Wednesday next week, according to the Met Office.

Around 4,700 homes across northern England and Scotland are still without supply - more than a week after the storm hit on November 26, according to energy industry bodies.

With work still ongoing to restore power, forecasters predict low temperatures of between 4C (39F) and 6C (43F).

The Met Office expects to see "unsettled" weather, with snow in the Cairngorms and Northern Pennines overnight on Saturday before turning drier and less windy into Sunday.

But the temporary relief will end on Monday when a band of rain and snow is expected, along with more wind, in the second half of the day.

The weather will be dry tomorrow, but will turn wintry from Monday

From Tuesday, the UK is set to see continued wind, rain, and snow - with a likelihood of more strong winds, although not as strong as Arwen, into Wednesday.

Simon Partridge, a meteorologist at the Met Office, said: "In terms of the process of reconnecting power supplies and getting to remote areas, it's not helpful - probably tomorrow being the best day and probably the first half of Tuesday as well, some decent conditions.

"Other than that, a fair bit of rain, some hill snow, and some reasonably strong winds - certainly aiding to slow down the process of reconnecting supplies and getting to the more remote locations to clear trees and so forth.

Yellow warnings have been issued for some parts of the UK

"It's certainly not ideal, and the higher locations certainly will be seeing some more snow in the coming days."

The Met Office has also issued yellow weather warnings for rain in parts of the north east of England and a yellow warning for snow for parts of the south east of Scotland.

The long delays have prompted energy regulator Ofgem to warn it will take enforcement action against network companies which failed to restore power to customers quickly enough following the storm.

It has also agreed with firms to lift the £700 cap on compensation which could be given to customers.

Parts of the north and Scotland were plunged into darkness by power cuts during Storm Arwen

The change will allow those affected to claim £70 for each 12-hour period they are left without power, after an initial £70 for the first 48 hours.

Chief executive Jonathan Brearley told the BBC Radio 4 programme: "We are deeply concerned about customers who for over a week have been without power.

"We want to establish the facts and make sure we understand what has happened, whether the network companies have met their obligations. If they haven't, we will take enforcement action.

People affected by the cuts will be able to claim £70 for each 12-hour period they're left without power

"We have clear expectations of how fast they should get people back on the system.

"We do recognise the challenging circumstances those companies are in. But what we expect from the network companies is to be relentless in connecting people, but also to be putting support in place."

He later told BBC Breakfast: "One thing we've done already is we've said to network companies, and they've agreed, they've lifted the cap on the compensation they will give customers and they'll make sure that those customers do get some compensation for everything they've been through."

A Met Office meteorologist said the looming weather is "not ideal" for reconnecting isolated homes with power

The Ministry of Defence said 297 personnel from the British Army and Royal Marines are supporting civil authorities and are conducting door-to-door checks on vulnerable people in their homes and providing reassurance to local communities.

Just days ago, Durham County Council raised a major incident alert after recording 6,500 homes were still living in darkness

Several schools in the area remain closed due to building damage and lack of power, heat, electricity or working phone lines, Chronicle Live reports.

A caravan site in Berwick-upon-Tweed in Northumberland was one of the worst-hit spots - where several holiday homes were razed to the ground by the force of the 98mph blast.

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