The UK has recorded the lowest daily death toll in seven months with four more deaths.

A further 2,963 new infections were also recorded, and the number of people to have received a first dose of a vaccine has hit nearly 33million.

Monday's tragic toll is the lowest since September 1, 2020, when three fatalities were recorded.

The figure is typically lower on Mondays after a weekend data reporting lag.

But the latest figure continues a downward trend in deaths as the lockdown and vaccination efforts take effect.

The last time the UK's daily toll was last consistently in the single digits was for a short period last summer, and at the very beginning of the pandemic when recording of the figures first began.

The number of people hospitalised with Covid was 179, according to figures recorded in the 24 hours to Monday.

A Moderna vaccine jab is given in Reading, Berkshire, as it became the third approved for us in the UK this month
A Moderna vaccine jab is given in Reading, Berkshire, as it became the third approved for us in the UK this month

Daily death tolls of three were also recorded on September 1 and on August 9, as well as on March 5 and 10 last year.

The NHS is currently allowing people aged 45 and over to book vaccines, as the Moderna vaccine rollout began last week.

The first doses of the jab are being offered in England, and it is the third vaccine to be added to the UK's stocks along with the Pfizer and Oxford AstraZeneca shots.

The death toll is continuing to drop even as lockdowns ease.

The first round of relaxing restrictions in England came on March 8 with schools reopening.

Pubs, restaurants, shops and gyms reopened with some limitations last Monday, in the most significant easing since the summer.

But the emergence of a new variant of the virus in India has prompted fresh concern and travel restrictions.

Travellers arrive at Heathrow Airport in London
Another country has been added to the UK's travel red list (file photo_

The country has been added to the UK's travel 'red list' in rules that will come into force at 4am Friday, Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced today.

That means anyone who is not a UK or Irish resident or British citizen and who has been to India in the past 10 days cannot travel into the UK from India.

Any permitted arrivals must pay to quarantine for 10 days in a government-managed isolation hotel.

Mr Hancock said today that 103 cases of the Indian variant have now been found in the UK, rising from 77 at the end of last week.

Members of the Labour party criticised the government today over the decision, saying India's addition to the red list should have been ordered earlier.