One of the UK’s first coronavirus patients stayed overnight at their student accommodation, it has been confirmed.

The student did not come into contact with other residents at the Vita Student block, the University of York said.

They are now being treated with a relative who also contracted the virus at a special facility in Newcastle.

In a statement today, the university said they ‘did return to their room on one occasion and stayed overnight’.

A spokesman said: ‘During this brief period the student did not meet other residents or staff at the building, or make use of the communal facilities.

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‘PHE (Public Health England) has confirmed that they do not need to undertake any contact tracing with residents of Vita Student.’

The accommodation is used by students from both University of York and York St John University.

Both UK patients who contracted the virus are understood to have recently travelled to the UK from China.

In a statement after the initial announcement, Chief Medical Officer for England Professor Chris Whitty said: ‘The patients are receiving specialist NHS care, and we are using tried and tested infection control procedures to prevent further spread of the virus.

‘The NHS is extremely well-prepared and used to managing infections and we are already working rapidly to identify any contacts the patients had, to prevent further spread.

‘We have been preparing for UK cases of novel coronavirus and we have robust infection control measures in place to respond immediately.’

The development in York came as thousands of Britons in mainland China were urged to leave as coronavirus continues to claim more lives in the country.

The Foreign Office amended its travel advice after Health Secretary Matt Hancock said he expects more cases to be diagnosed in the UK.

Officials said the update was a prudent step in case more commercial airlines stopped flights out of China, or China extended travel restrictions.

Wuhan Coronavirus - is there a vaccine and what are the symptoms?

The novel coronavirus was first detected in the Chinese city of Wuhan, which has a population of 11m people, in December.

It has led to large parts of China being placed under quarantine, with flights and transport being grounded and Lunar New Year celebrations being cancelled as China attempts to prevent others from becoming infected.

Cases have also been reported in other parts of the world including Hong Kong, Japan, Macau, Vietnam, South Korea, Thailand, Canada, the US, France and Germany.

Is there a vaccine for coronavirus?

At present there is no vaccine for coronavirus - although several different organisations are working to create one.

Those reported to be working on a potential vaccine include National Institutes of Health as well as other private companies including Inovio, Novavax, Johnson and Johnson and Moderna - the latter working directly with US government health agencies.

Despite all the combined efforts it could still be a while before a vaccine against the current coronavirus is ready.

A spokesman for the Institutes said that it could be a few months before the first clinical trials get underway, and a year or more before it's available.

Meanwhile Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, who are also reported to be working on a vaccine, have said that if one were developed it would most likely be given to healthcare workers first due to their exposure to patients suffering from coronavirus.

What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

The early symptoms of the virus include a dry cough, a fever, shortness of breath and a sore throat.

While many of those affected have shown only mild symptoms, some have gone on to develop fluid in the lungs consistent with viral pneumonia.

The virus is more likely to progress into a severe illness or prove fatal among older patients or those with weakened immune systems.

There is no specific cure for the coronavirus - as it's a viral infection, antibiotics won't help.

The World Health Organisation has suggested avoiding close contact with anyone suffering from an acute respiratory infection and ensuing that coughs and sneezes are covered with disposable tissues or clothing.

They also recommend regular hand-washing as well as  avoiding unprotected contact with wild or farm animals.