On January 25, Scots and their descendants around the world will pay homage to one of the world's greatest poets and song writers.

Over his lifetime Robert Burns completed over 700 poems and songs, creating an incredible catalogue of work and producing some of the most famous verses in Scotland's history.

To add a little fun to any Burns Night celebration this month, we've picked out three of his most famous for anyone looking to add a little extra entertainment to their night.

Selkirk Grace

The Selkirk Grace is usually said before the Burns Supper is served.
The Selkirk Grace is usually said before the Burns Supper is served.

This short but important poem is usually read before the main meal and the piping in of the haggis, you'll find an English translation easily enough but the Scots version is the original and should be how it is read aloud.

Ideal for children, it's very short and easy to learn - but most of all fun to recite.

The Selkirk Grace

"Some hae meat and canna eat,
And some wad eat that want it,
But we hae meat and we can eat,
And sae the Lord be thankit."

My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose

An actor dressed as Robert Burns gives out a red, red rose.
An actor dressed as Robert Burns gives out a red, red rose.

Known to be a lover of the Lassies, Burns poured a little of his romantic spirit into this beautiful poem.

Slightly longer, the four verses are easy to learn, the rhyme of each section and the repetition of certain lines makes it memorable.

My Love is like a Red, Red Rose

"O my Luve is like a red, red rose
That’s newly sprung in June;
O my Luve is like the melody
That’s sweetly played in tune.

"So fair art thou, my bonnie lass,
So deep in luve am I;
And I will luve thee still, my dear,
Till a’ the seas gang dry.

"Till a’ the seas gang dry, my dear,
And the rocks melt wi’ the sun;
I will love thee still, my dear,
While the sands o’ life shall run.

"And fare thee weel, my only luve!


And fare thee weel awhile!
And I will come again, my luve,
Though it were ten thousand mile."

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Ae Fond Kiss

Another of Rabbie's romantic poems and one that's gained fame through song. With plenty of versions available to stream online it'll make memorising the poem all the more easier.

The poem tells the bittersweet tale of two lovers forced to part.

Ae Fond Kiss

"A fond kiss, and then we sever;
A farewell, and then forever!
Deep in heart-wrung tears I'll pledge thee,
Warring sighs and groans I'll wage thee.

"Who shall say that Fortune grieves him,
While the star of hope she leaves him?
Me, nae cheerfu' twinkle lights me;
Dark despair around benights me.

"I'll ne'er blame my partial fancy,
Nothing could resist my Nancy;
But to see her was to love her;
Love but her, and love forever.
Had we never lov'd say kindly,
Had we never lov'd say blindly,
Never met--or never parted--
We had ne'er been broken-hearted.

"Fare thee well, thou first and fairest!
Fare thee well, thou best and dearest!
Thine be like a joy and treasure,
Peace. enjoyment, love, and pleasure!
A fond kiss, and then we sever;
A farewell, alas, forever!

"Deep in heart-wrung tears I'll pledge thee,
Warring sighs and groans I'll wage thee!"