A picture of an electric car being charged on a pavement has sparked a fierce debate online about the practicality of electric vehicles and the loss of pedestrianised spaces.

A resident in Cardiff posted a picture to Twitter of an electric BMW parked on the pavement outside a house. A cable can be seen stretching from the home over the front garden and connecting to the charging point of the car.

Above the image the user wrote: "Genuinely staggered to come across this on a walk with the baby. Since the 1900s we’ve given so much space over to petrol cars. We can’t allow the small pockets left for people to be given over to electric cars."

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The dad's outrage was echoed in the majority of replies to the post, with several branding the behaviour "selfish".

"This just won't do. It's obstructing the footway with a vehicle – its mode of propulsion does not change that," wrote Martin Hayman.

User 'rosamundi' said: "You don't get to block the pavement with your private property, go and charge it somewhere else."

"If you want to connect to the house give up your garden don't ask me to give up the footpath," said Bill Harvey, adding: "I would be tempted to walk over that."

Meanwhile Cardiff brand I Loves The 'Diff chipped in: "Crazy. If you can afford that car, you can afford a longer cable. (And a guard to protect pedestrians walking over it.)"

Not all agreed, however, with several pointing out there was enough room to get around the car. Carrie said: "Obviously not a fab situation but the pavement is massive and a pram or wheelchair could easily get past."

Tim Oldland wrote: "How about you finding an issue where there isn’t one? Plenty of room to get past, they’re just trying to create the safest situation they can. Would you prefer a long cable draped across to the road? Because that’s their other choice here. Find something real to get annoyed about."

Dr Nick Bailey accused critics of "EV [electric vehicle] shaming", adding: "I get it's annoying, but that is a pretty wide pavement."

He continued: "I notice the car deliberately parked very close to wall to give max space on other side and to avoid a trip hazard cable."

But some pointed out the inconvenience the position of the car would cause to disabled people and people with prams in particular.

User Ellie said: "All the people saying there’s room to go around, this is irrelevant. The pavement is there for all users. My partner is blind. He could damage his cane bumping into this car and then he would have difficulties getting around at all."

Another poster, called 'G', wrote: "I'd say unbelievable, but it's totally believable. And until they get their council tax-subsidised charging stations on every street, they'll just hold the pavement hostage. Prams and wheelchair users be damned."

The sale of new petrol and diesel cars will end in the UK in 2030
The sale of new petrol and diesel cars will end in the UK in 2030

Some others also pointed out the wider issue of the practicality of charging electric vehicles.

Suzi Ovens wrote: "Electric cars are growing quickly in popularity in the UK but the infrastructure to charge the cars is extremely lacking and a lot of local authorities are just not keeping up."

User 'seagull' reiterated her point, writing: "Why is no one talking about that we just don’t have the infrastructure for us all to have electric cars? I don’t have a drive, which isn’t that unusual. Many people live in flats/apartments. How is it suppose to practically work?"

However fellow residents pointed out that there are public charging points nearby. Matt Smith said there was "literally no excuse for this", while Phil Slator quipped: "Presumably he had a petrol pump in his front garden before he bought that electric car?"

The picture resonated with a widespread audience, even as far as New Zealand and Canada, and it seems the issue is reflected across the world.

Some shared similar pictures from across the UK while Jason Bryant from Auckland said he'd seen the same on "every single street" in his area.

The heated discussion comes as there is a major bid by the UK government to try and move drivers away from petrol and diesel cars.

Earlier this month, in a speech to the Confederation of British Industry (CBI), Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced new legislation that will require new homes in England to have electric vehicle charging points installed from 2022.

Supermarkets and workplaces will also be required to have the charging points installed as well as homes undergoing major renovations.

The government has already announced that the sale of new petrol and diesel cars will end in the UK in 2030 and it is hoped the new laws will mean up to 145,000 new charging points will be made available every year.

Downing Street branded the move as “world-leading” and the hope is that charging an electric vehicle will become as easy as filling up with fuel.

It seems more and more of us are turning to electric vehicles. Last month it was reported that sales of electric vehicles had soared amid the fuel crisis with one company logging a 228.57% increase in orders in the month of September compared to the year before.