It is no secret that Wales is one of the most beautiful countries in the world - yet not all of its treasures are as well known as they deserve to be.

Travel agent Hayes and Jarvis analysed over 100,000 tourist attractions across the world in order to come up with a list of the globe's top secret spots.

They identified them by looking for places that a low number of TripAdvisor reviews, but a high proportion of five-star ratings.

Amongst some of the secret spots highlighted in Wales are the Six Bells Mining Memorial in Abertillery and the Hafod Uchtryd estate in Ceredigion.

The research was done by looking at attractions with in the bottom 40% for total reviews, and these attractions were then ranked by percentage of five-star reviews.

If two attractions had an equal percentage of five-star reviews, the percentage of four-star reviews broke the tie.

What are Wales' Top 10 secret spots?

1. Llyn Y Fan Fach, Carmarthenshire

Llyn y Fan Fach, Carmarthenshire

The top secret spot is nestled amongst steep slopes in the Carmarthenshire landscape.

In Welsh folklore, a young farmer of the 13th century is said to have spotted tge most beautiful girl he'd ever seen emerge from the lake, she was a princess of the kingdom of fairies. This is known as the lady of the lake.

Tourists labelled the secret spot as "absolutely breathtaking" and a "magical walk."

Not for the light hearted, this beautiful hidden lake is approximately 5km walk from the closest carpark, and isn't suitable for wheelchairs and pushchairs.

2. Hafod Uchtryd, Ceredigion

Hafod Uchtryd

Truly hidden in the foothills of the Cambrian mountains of Ceredigion, not far from Aberystwyth, this wooded estate will take you back to the 18th century.

Made up of nine miles of restored footpaths, the surroundings are full of diverse greenery and wildlife.

It has been described by visitors as "simply gorgeous" with "stunning waterfalls".

3. Penrhos Country Park, Anglesey

Penrhos Country Park

A beautiful combination of woodland that stretches out onto an open beach, this has been described as a must visit for Holyhead in Anglesey.

The perfect place to take your dogs for a walk, you can see for miles across the estuary.

The area is also very flat making it accessible for wheelchairs and pushchairs with plenty of parking in the area.

Visitors described it as a "magical and relaxing place."

4. Talyllyn Lake, Gwynedd

Talyllyn Lake

A 220 acre ribbon lake at the food of Cadair Idris in Southern Snowdonia, this picturesque lake is framed by a beautiful valley of mountains.

According to visitors, this is the perfect spot for a picnic, where you may also be able to spot some neighbouring otters and other wildlife.

There is also a hotel nearby to provide you with a much needed refreshment after a walk around the lake.

5. Wye Valley, Monmouth

Wye Valley

Situated along the border with England, Wye Valley is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, giving its countryside a protected status.

The area is made up of rolling hills, a river and woodlands for walking, cycling and canoeing.

Perfect for adventure seekers, the area has been described by visitors as a "less commercial break" with "spectacular scenery".

6. Traeth Mawr Beach, Anglesey

Traeth Mawr in Welsh means big beach, and this beach situated near the Aberffraw dunes, offers rolling sands and a long bay.

The beach has been described as a "natural beauty, " which is dog friendly all year around.

7. Caerau Uchaf Gardens, Gwynedd

Caerau Uchaf Gardens

These gardens sit 1,000 ft above sea level and are the highest of their kind in North Wales.

The gardens have a variety of plants to explore and are surrounded by beautiful views of the surrounding countryside.

There is also a café hidden in the privately owned gardens that serves home cooked lunches and cakes.

8. Guardian - Six Bells Mining Memorial, Abertillery

Six Bells Miners Memorial sculpture

The 20 metre sculpture commemorates the 50th anniversary of the 1960 mining disaster in Six Bells, and features the names of the men who sadly lost their lives.

Representing the rich mining history in the South Wales Valleys, the memorial has been described by visitors as a haunting reminder of those who lost their lives in the disaster.

The Guardian statue was designed by Sebastien Boyesen to mark the 50th anniversary of the tragedy and it was built over the site of the former colliery in 2010.

It serves as a constant reminder to those who lost their lives as well as the importance of the coal industry in shaping modern Wales.

9. Llyn Brianne Dam and Reservoir, Llandovery

Llyn Brianne Reservoir

This beautiful reservoir is situated in the mountainous Powys countryside just north of Llandovery.

The reservoir has been described by visitors as "a beautiful place perfect for long walks". It is also a perfect place to enjoy a scenic drive.

The spillway of the dam is also one not to miss.