These striking photos of Liverpool landmarks and streets offer a glimpse of time gone by.

If you've been to Liverpool city centre in recent times, you'll know parts have changed quite dramatically while other look exactly the dame.

Rediscovering the living history of the city illustrated book Liverpool and Merseyside Then and Now offers a fascinating comparison of people, places and events from the past in comparison to present day.

Read More: Liverpool ONE's grand opening where crowds filled the streets

Some images show the loss of some of our much-loved department stores in World War II, whereas others in later years show local businesses and landmarks that are still fondly remembered today.

Here, we take a look at some of the people, events and places from bygone years and how the same locations look today.

The ECHO has launched a 48-page Christmas nostalgia supplement in print. It's perfect as a stocking filler and yours for just £2.50. You can order a copy here.

Church Street

Shopping, cars and buses in a busy Church Street, Liverpool, England. It is mid afternoon as shoppers hunt down a January Sale bargain. January 6, 1962
Shopping, cars and buses in a busy Church Street, Liverpool. It is mid afternoon as shoppers hunt down a January Sale bargain. January 6, 1962

In January 1962, shoppers can be seen hunting for bargains outside Marks & Spencer, in Church Street, with well-known furriers Swears and Wells on the corner.

People are queuing for buses as cars mill down the busy street and pedestrians try to cross.

Church Street is pedestrianised now but still remains as busy as ever.

Shoppers on Church Street, Liverpool city centre
Shoppers on Church Street, Liverpool

It is still the city’s prime shopping area and Marks & Spencer still stands in same position.

Other stores include TK Maxx, Lush, Primark and River Island.

Central Station

Busy scenes on Ranelagh Street outside Liverpool Central Railway station. February 18, 1960
Busy scenes on Ranelagh Street outside Liverpool Central Railway station on February 18, 1960

Here’s the familiar approach to Liverpool Central Station photographed more than 60 years ago in February 1960.

Women can be seen chatting on the cobblestones as a double-decker bus passes by on Ranelagh Street.

And behind the pedestrians is the impressive three-storey entrance building that fronted the 65ft high iron and glass train shed.

Scaffolding around Liverpool Central Station
Scaffolding around Liverpool Central Station, Renelagh Street

Today, the Merseyrail station, on the Northern Line and Wirral Line, is the busiest station in the city – and the seventh busiest outside London.

It has seen construction work over the years, but today the station and street is home to other outlets including Subway, Cinnabon and Archies.

Castle Street

Liverpool film premiere of `A Hard Day's Night' at the Odeon Cinema. St Johns Ambulance personnel carry away a young girl overcome. July 10, 1964
Beatlemania - St Johns Ambulance personnel carry away a young girl overcome. July 10, 1964

In July 1964, thousands of fans greeted the Beatles who landed at Speke Airport to make their way to the Odeon Cinema for the Northern premiere of their film, A Hard Day’s Night.

For some the excitement was too much as the above photo of crowds on Castle Street shows.

But St John Ambulance staff were on hand to help as police held back eager fans.

Pedestrians on Castle Street
Pedestrians on Castle Street, Liverpool

Nowadays, the street is home to some of the city’s most popular bars and restaurants and if you look above the daily sea of people, you can still see the handsome, historic buildings of Castle Street.

Tables now adorn the pavements and on the left you can find restaurants Gino's and Rudy's pizza with Rox's pink neon sign in the background to the right.

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George's Dock

The Overhead Railway Bridge in Liverpool 1955
The Overhead Railway Bridge, Liverpool, 1955

The imposing Art Deco lines of the George’s Dock Building ventilation tower stand out in this image from December 1955 with the Royal Liver Building rising up in the background.

To the front is the Liverpool Overhead Railway with cars, vans and trucks trundling over the cobblestones beneath its iron bridge.

However in September 1957, dismantling work on the overhead railways began.

George's Dock Building with the Royal Liver Building rising up in the background
George's Dock Building, with the Royal Liver Building rising up in the background

Today, the iconic landmarks are as recognisable as ever and remain fairly unchanged.

But the overhead railway is long gone and the Strand is now one of the city's busiest roads.

Clayton Square

Clayton Square, Liverpool. December 15, 1983
Clayton Square. December 15, 1983

This photographs shows the Owen Owen department store in Clayton Square gearing up for Christmas in 1983.

Decorations and window displays are in place ready for the final festive rush and cars and lorries are parked outside the stor, with traffic lights outside the main entrance.

After a long history in the city-centre, the company was taken over by Philip Green in 1994 and the Owen Owen store in Clayton Square finally closed its doors in 1995.

The ECHO has launched a 48-page Christmas nostalgia supplement in print. It's perfect as a stocking filler and yours for just £2.50. You can order a copy here.

Clayton Square, Liverpool
Clayton Square, Liverpool

Its Clayton Square store later became a Tesco Metro with Clas Ohlson located nearby.

But its a big contrast to the hoarding and scaffolding in the modern snapshot.

Blacklers

Bomb damage in Liverpool during the Second World War. Blacklers department store on the corner of Elliot Street and Great Charlotte Street in Liverpool. Severely damaged in The Blitz of May 1941 during World War II. Liverpool, Merseyside, May 1941.
Blacklers department store on the corner of Elliot Street and Great Charlotte Street in Liverpool. Severely damaged in The Blitz of May 1941 during World War II

The familiar frontage of Blacklers department store is pictured after being severely damaged in the Liverpool Blitz of May 1941.

Windows are blown out and smoke is still rising from the charred ground floor of the building at the corner of Elliot Street and Great Charlotte Street.

After the 1941 damage, trading moved to shops in Church Street and Bold Street until 1953. Blacklers traded for three more decades until it finally closed in the 1980s.

The former Blackers store which later became a branch of pub-chain Weatherspoons named The Richard John Blackler as a nod to its origins
The former Blackers store, which later became a branch of pub-chain Weatherspoons named The Richard John Blackler as a nod to its origins

Blackers later became a branch of pub-chain Weatherspoons named The Richard John Blackler as a nod to its origins.

The site sees hundreds of visitors and pedestrians pass it every day but the structure of the building is still very similar to its Blacklers days.

Lewis's

Second World War, May Blitz in Liverpool. The shell of Lewis's building which earlier that day had been crowded with shoppers. May 3, 1941
The shell of Lewis's building which earlier that day had been crowded with shoppers. May 3, 1941

Lewis’s in Ranelagh Street was another famous stored gutted by Luftwaffe bombs in May 1941.

The building was a burned-out shell by Saturday, May 3 – the distinctive round arches of the first floor charred and blackened by fire.

Lewis's went into liquidation in March 2007 but was sold to Vergo Retail and continued to use the Lewis’s name before the store closed permanently in May 2010.

The Lewis's building on Ranelagh Street
The Lewis's building on Ranelagh Street, Liverpool

Now, the building is home to a hotel on one of its floors and a Pure Gym.

But the exterior of the Lewis's building remains the same as it's been known and loved across the generations.

Lord Street

General scene of Lord Street Liverpool, Merseyside. July 10, 1980
General scene of Lord Street Liverpool. July 10, 1980

In July 1980, shoppers are seen checking out the window displays of some once familiar stores including British Home Stores (BHS) and Ratners, on Lord Street, in the city-centre.

Thousands of children down the years bought their school uniforms at BHS.

In 1986, it merged with Mothercare and Habitat to form Storehouse plc.

Shoppers off Lord Street, Liverpool city centre
Shoppers off Lord Street, Liverpool

But after dominating Lord Street for decades, BHS in Liverpool officially closed in 2016.

A lot of the businesses have changed on Lord Street over the years and in today H&M, The Perfume Shop and Rococo Coffee are among those calling it home.

Chinatown

Children playing in the streets of Liverpool's Chinatown. November 20, 1933
Children playing in the streets of Liverpool's Chinatown on November 20, 1933

Here, children play innocently on the cobblestones in Liverpool’s Chinatown in November 1933.

Mothers and their babies are watching from their front doors during the inter-war years.

A few cars are parked in the distance, beyond the gas lamps, leaving the children to enjoy themselves.

Chinatown, Liverpool city centre
Liverpool's Chinatown, Liverpool city centre

The street today hosts a number of restaurants and businesses

Queensway Tunnel

Mersey Tunnel Opening , Liverpool, July 1934 by King George IV and Queen Mary
Mersey Tunnel Opening , Liverpool, July 1934, by King George IV and Queen Mary

In July 1934, crowds gathered for the grand opening of the Queensway tunnel by King George V.

Spectators are seen lining either side of the entrance while contractors’ trucks have parked up after making an early crossing under the Mersey.

Constructed at a cost of £8m the tunnel took nine years to build.

The Queensway tunnel, Liverpool
The Queensway tunnel in Liverpool

Today, the structure of the entrance to the tunnel looks very unchanged.

But the buildings around it and pathways are unrecognisable .

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These images are among many to feature in Liverpool and Merseyside Then and Now, an illustrated book .

It is the first compilation of the informative and entertaining Then and Now features published every Sunday in Liverpool Echo.

To purchase your copy and find out more, call the order hotline on 01928 503777 or click here.

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