A couple with a ten-day-old child found themselves homeless and turned up at a soup kitchen asking for help.

At the same place a mother with two- school age kids stood in line waiting to be served.

What a desperate indictment of our society and the inadequacy of the safety net that’s meant to help the poor and vulnerable.

It is shocking there are people in modern-day Scotland who feel they must turn for help not just to a foodbank but to a soup kitchen.

There are agencies that deal with struggling families but there are people whose chaotic lives mean that they fall through the gaps or do not know which way to turn.

A soup kitchen under the Hielenman’s Umbrella in Glasgow is not the kind of place where we should be meeting the challenge of poverty and homelessness.

The welfare state has been eroded by a decade of Tory austerity including their recent unacceptable cut to Universal Credit, a payment which kept many families just above the breadline.

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There are no easy solutions to fixing this mess but the Scottish Child payment - £10 a week to the poorest families - will make a difference.

It is a commendable first move by the Scottish Government, showing the devolution of powers does work.

But it is not enough - double it, and double it again is the message from poverty campaigners.

We can’t afford to wait around while there are families turning to soup kitchens. The money should be found now.

Those who witnessed and survived the devastating explosion in Ayr will remember it for the rest of their lives.

It is a miracle no one was killed when you look at the pictures of the scenes from the aftermath of the Grose Park blast.

The natural reaction to danger is to take flight and who could be blamed under the circumstances for putting their own safety first?

But Alex Craig and his neighbours didn’t think of themselves. They headed towards the danger.

They helped dig a young victim from the rubble before Alex’s brother-in-law took the boy to hospital.

Chris McNicol did his bit before dusting himself down and heading off to start his shift in McDonalds.

In a moment of need, the Kincaidston residents were not found wanting.

Alex, Chris and the other neighbours are a credit to their communityAt the same place a mother with two-school age kids stood in line waiting to be served.

What a desperate indictment of our society and the inadequacy of the safety net that’s meant to help the poor and vulnerable.

It is shocking there are people in modern-day Scotland who feel they must turn for help not just to a foodbank but to a soup kitchen.

There are agencies that deal with struggling families but there are people whose chaotic lives mean that they fall through the gaps or do not know which way to turn.

A soup kitchen under the Hielenman’s Umbrella in Glasgow is not the kind of place where we should be meeting the challenge of poverty and homelessness.

The welfare state has been eroded by a decade of Tory austerity including their recent unacceptable cut to Universal Credit, a payment which kept many families just above the breadline.

There are no easy solutions to fixing this mess but the Scottish Child payment - £10 a week to the poorest families - will make a difference. It is a commendable first move by the Scottish Government, showing the devolution of powers does work.

But it is not enough - double it, and double it again is the message from poverty campaigners.

We can’t afford to wait around while there are families turning to soup kitchens. The money should be found now.

-------------------

Those who witnessed and survived the devastating explosion in Ayr will remember it for the rest of their lives.

It is a miracle no one was killed when you look at the pictures of the scenes from the aftermath of the Grose Park blast.

The natural reaction to danger is to take flight and who could be blamed under the circumstances for putting their own safety first?

But Alex Craig and his neighbours didn’t think of themselves. They headed towards the danger.

They helped dig a young victim from the rubble before Alex’s brother-in-law took the boy to hospital.

Chris McNicol did his bit before dusting himself down and heading off to start his shift in McDonalds.

In a moment of need, the Kincaidston residents were not found wanting.

Alex, Chris and the other neighbours are a credit to their community.