A Scot has shared the adorable moment a little pine marten popped its head in his holiday cottage window.

Neil Bletcher, who has a holiday house in Ardnamurchan on the west coast, was relaxing in his sun porch when the brazen little creature decided to poke its head in an open window.

Neil managed to capture the weasel like animal acting mischievously as it nosed around.

Neil said the elusive critters are regular visitors.
Neil said the elusive critters are regular visitors.

Having become something of an interest for him, Neil explained that the curious critters come round almost every evening, though you have to look out for them on dark nights.

Now a big fan, he added that they are becoming more common in the Ardnamurchan area, compared to 30 or so years ago.

Having become quite used to spotting them around the property, Neil has captured more than a few photographs of his little visitors and has even named some of them, he said: "We call the one in the video ‘spotty cheek’, she is a female born last year. We also named her mother ‘Buttons’."

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He explained that the female pine marten will give birth to between one and three kits in springtime, he said: "I would normally notice them once they leave the den, near the end of July, which is when they will explore the area.

"This year, there were three kits however unfortunately one went missing - probably attacked by a fox which is their main predator."

The wildlife enthusiast added that they have benefits for any area they are introduced to, with their ability to help control the non-native Grey Squirrel populations, he said: "With the grey squirrels being heavier and more of a ground feeder, they are easier for the pine marten to catch than our native reds who are lighter and can escape to the end of thin branches where Pine Martens can’t reach them.

"This has had some success in areas where there have previously been only grey squirrels have seen our native reds start to return thanks to the efforts of the pine martens."