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People friendly streets: Traffic cameras will stop Mayton Street being used as a cut-through to Holloway Morrison’s

Cllr Rowena Champion (r) with Finsbury Park ward councillors Cllr Michael O'Sullivan (c) and Cllr Gary Heather (l) in Mayton Street. Picture: Islington Council/ Em Fitzgerald Photography

Cllr Rowena Champion (r) with Finsbury Park ward councillors Cllr Michael O'Sullivan (c) and Cllr Gary Heather (l) in Mayton Street. Picture: Islington Council/ Em Fitzgerald Photography

Em Fitzgerald Photography

Islington Council is installing traffic cameras to stop Mayton Street being used as a cut-through to the Morrison’s supermarket in Holloway.

Work on installing cameras, road markings and signage started on Monday, and from Saturday vehicles will be banned from accessing the shop’s carpark in Hertslet Road via Mayton Street and the parallel Roden Street.

The traffic reductions measures are part of the council’s drive for “people-friendly” streets.

To make space for vehicles to turn around, two parking spaces will be removed in Roden Street, and another one in Mayton Street.

The measures will be introduced under an 18-month experimental traffic order, during which their impacts will be closely monitored to inform a decision about the scheme remaining in place permanently.

The council’s eco and transport chief, Cllr Rowena Champion, said: “We are working tirelessly to create streets that are more friendly, greener and safer for our residents, and are listening to local people as we do so.

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“These measures will end Mayton Street’s use as a cut-through, reducing air and noise pollution whilst making the street safer for local people.

“I applaud the fantastic work the Finsbury Park councillors have done to champion the concerns of Mayton Street’s local residents about the traffic on their street.”

Mayton Street residents started a petition this month after the council asked them to remove mini-gardens they had planted in pallets on the road, claiming they contravene the Highways Act.

Residents think the gardens helped make the streets “people friendly” - in line with the council’s initiative - but the council wants them to pay if they wish to retain them under a new scheme.

The introduction of the new measures in Mayton follows a public consultation with local people in November and December, during which a majority of residents voiced their support for them.

The council has been criticised for its two other “people-friendly” streets schemes in St Peter’s and Canonbury East which were introduced in July to prevent rat-running, despite having not been consulted upon.

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