A pandemonium of parrots at a wildlife park have been removed temporarily after swearing at visitors.

Five of the newly adopted parrots had been in quarantine together in the same room after being brought into Lincolnshire Wildlife Park on August 15.

To cure their boredom in self-isolation, it appears they entertained themselves by sharing their knowledge of swear words.

The park’s chief executive, Steve Nichols, said his team member couldn’t help but crack a smile when hearing their foul language – but said this only encouraged the birds to do it more.

They were temporarily removed from public view and put into ‘time out’ to think about what they have done.

He said: “For the last 25 years, we have always taken in parrots that have sometimes had a bit of blue language and we have really got used to that.

“Every now and then you’ll get one that swears and it’s always funny. We always find it very comical when they do swear at you.

“But, just by coincidence, we took in five in the same week and because they were all quarantined together it meant that one room was just full of swearing birds.

“The more they swear the more you usually laugh which then triggers them to swear again.

Five parrots at Lincolnshire Wildlife Park have been temporarily removed after they started swearing at customers

“But when you get four or five together that have learnt the swearing and naturally learnt the laughing, when one swears, one laughs and before you know it just got to be like an old working men’s’ club scenario where they are all just swearing and laughing.”

The birds were soon put out on display – but it didn’t take long before the swearing resumed, reports Lincolnshire Live.

Mr Nichols, who admits it is rather funny when the birds swear, said: “Literally within 20 minutes of being in the introductory we were told that they had sworn at a customer and for the next group of people, all sorts of obscenities came out.

“And for one of our young girls they really gave her some abuse.

“We found it highly amusing and the customers were fine – they were no problem at all.

“But we worried because we had a weekend coming up and children coming.”

Despite wanting to give people a laugh during some incredibly worrying times with Covid-19, a decision was made to put the birds where they couldn’t be heard before children arrived.

Mr Nichols said: “We put them in an off-shore enclosure with the intention that hopefully they will start learning the other parrot’s noise that are around.

The newly adopted parrots, brought into The Friskney Park on August 15, had been in quarantine together in the same room

“They are African grey parrots and they are very, very good at learning vocalisations from all sorts of noises.

“What we will do now is release them out but in separate areas so at least if they do swear it is not as bad as three or four of them all blasting it out at once.”

Mr Nichols admits the swearing parrots have provided some light relief during a tough time for the park because of the pandemic.

He said: “It has been very hard. The charity is going to end up losing somewhere between £300,000 and £400,000 for this year.

“It has been a real rough year, but we are the eternal optimists and we have no option. We have to keep moving forward.

“We are now planning for next Easter and hoping that everything is at least in some kind of normality by then.”

The park has also made headlines around the world after a video of Chico, a parrot at the park, singing Beyonce’s ‘If I were a boy’ went viral.

And Mr Nichols says that, along with the swearing parrots has been good for business.

He said: “It has kept some kind of normality. It hasn’t brought any cash in and hasn’t made us secure but a lot of people have come to see him.

“They have actually come to see Chico and now they have heard about the swearing parrots it is quite an unusual place where you are walking around and people are swearing at aviaries trying to get a parrot to swear back at them.

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“It’s turned into an adult theme park at the moment but only for language.

“It’s all been with absolute fun – it’s been brilliant. It’s been a rough year but it has ended with a bit of a smile anyway.”