Ozzy Osbourne has cancelled his North American tour to undergo further medical treatment.

The 71-year-old former Black Sabbath singer recently revealed he has been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and had previously been recovering from injuries sustained in a fall at home.

He had been set to embark on the US leg of his No More Tours 2 tour in May, but will instead travel to Europe for medical treatment.

In a statement, Ozzy revealed: "I'm so thankful that everyone has been patient because I've had a s*** year.

"Unfortunately, I won't be able to get to Switzerland for treatment until April and the treatment takes six-eight weeks.

Ozzy Osbourne and daughter Kelly at the Grammy Awards in January

"I don't want to start a tour and then cancel shows at the last minute, as it's just not fair to the fans.

"I'd rather they get a refund now and when I do the North American tour down the road, everyone who bought a ticket for these shows will be the first ones in line to purchase tickets at that time."

Ozzy is due to start the UK leg of the tour in October, when he heads to Newcastle upon Tyne.

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The iconic heavy metal singer, known to fans as the Prince of Darkness, revealed in January he had been diagnosed with the neurodegenerative disorder Parkinson's disease.

He and wife Sharon, 67, said at the time they planned to go abroad for treatment, while Ozzy admitted he found it difficult to keep the facts about his health a secret.

He said: "To hide something inside for a while, it's hard. You never feel proper, you feel guilty.

Ozzy Osbourne performing on the Download Festival main stage

"I'm no good with secrets. I cannot walk around with it any more because it's like I'm running out of excuses, you know?"

Ozzy's touring has been disrupted by a series of health issues. He fell at home last year, aggravating injuries from a near-fatal quad bike crash in 2003.

His latest album, Ordinary Man, is set for release on Friday.

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