An MP who was diagnosed with Covid-19 has issued an apology for attending Parliament after she experienced symptoms.

SNP MP Margaret Ferrier travelled to London to debate the coronavirus response when she had already started to feel unwell.

She said she took a test on Saturday afternoon after experiencing “mild symptoms”, meaning she should have self-isolated, before travelling by train to London on Monday.

“This was wrong, and I am very sorry for my mistake,” the MP for Rutherglen and Hamilton West said.

In a tweet, she added that “there is no excuse for my actions” after revealing her journey while positive with the virus.

Ms Ferrier spoke in the coronavirus debate in the House of Commons on Monday and, by her account, tested positive for Covid-19 that evening.

Margaret Ferrier who has apologised for travelling to London while feeling symptoms
Margaret Ferrier who has apologised for travelling to London while feeling symptoms

“I travelled home by train on Tuesday morning without seeking advice. This was also wrong and I am sorry.

“I have been self-isolating at home ever since,” she said.

The MP has “notified the police of my actions” and has informed the test and trace system and Commons authorities.

“Despite feeling well, I should have self-isolated while waiting for my test result, and I deeply regret my actions.

“I take full responsibility and I would urge everyone not to make the same mistakes that I have, and do all they can to help limit the spread of Covid-19,” she said.

Ms Ferrier has previously criticised Boris Johnson’s senior adviser Dominic Cummings for his conduct during the pandemic.

Dominic Cummings answers questions from the media following calls for him to be sacked over allegations he breached coronavirus lockdown restrictions
Dominic Cummings answers questions from the media following calls for him to be sacked over allegations he breached coronavirus lockdown restrictions

Speaking during Cabinet Office questions on June 11, Ms Ferrier told the Commons: “Public health experts have voiced concerns that Dominic Cummings did undermine public trust in lockdown rules, going against the principle of integrity that is in the code of conduct.

“Will the Cabinet Office conduct an investigation into potential breaches of the code of conduct by Mr Cummings, or have ministers yet again decided that they have had enough of experts?”

The subject of the questions at that point in the session was the code of conduct of special advisers.

A number of politicians have called for her to resign following the incident.

Ruth Davidson, the leader of the Conservative Party in the Scottish Parliament, tweeted: “This Margaret Ferrier case is different – knowingly taking public transport after testing positive for COVID-19 is to put lives at risk.

“She has to go.”

Former Scottish Labour and Co-operative MP Paul Sweeney called for Margaret Ferrier to resign.

Mr Sweeney tweeted: “An MP travelling to London by train while awaiting a Covid test result is obviously a stupid thing to do.

“To then travel back to Glasgow by train after receiving a positive result is grossly negligent.

“Ms Ferrier should heed the advice she offered to Mr Cummings, and resign.”

Tory MP Alicia Kearns said it was “unforgivable” Ms Ferrier waited three days to tell MPs she had tested positive for the virus.

A House of Commons spokesperson said: “An MP has confirmed that they have been diagnosed with coronavirus. The House’s priority is to ensure that those on the estate are safe while business is facilitated.

“We have closely followed public health guidance on the action to take following a confirmed case of Covid on site.

"Parliament has a dedicated team to support the test and trace teams across the UK, acting as a central point of contact in the event of any suspected or confirmed cases, where an individual has been working on the estate.

“We are also implementing a number of cleaning measures to ensure those working on the estate can maintain a clean and hygienic working environment and ensuring Parliament adheres to the Government’s ‘working safely during coronavirus’ guidance.

“Our risk assessment outlines the measures we have already put in place to reduce the risk of transmission in Parliament. The Speakers and political leadership of both Houses are keeping the situation under constant review.”