The Queen paused for a moment before heading in the chapel to her husband Prince Philip's funeral as if she "could not face going in alone", a body language expert said.

Her Majesty rode in a state Bentley with her 81-year-old lady-in-waiting, Lady Susan Hussey, while her four children and grandchildren walked behind the Duke of Edinburgh's coffin in procession.

During the short ride, the grieving monarch appeared to be dabbing her eye as they headed towards St George's Chapel, where Philip was interred in the Royal Vault.

After arriving, the grieving monarch stepped out of the car and paused for a moment before greeting Right Reverend David Conner, Dean of Windsor, by the entrance.

The Queen arriving at St George's Chapel
Her Majesty looked back to wait for her lady-in-waiting before heading to St George's Chapel

Expert Judi James analysed the Queen's body language and told MailOnline: "She could be seen dabbing one eye as she sat in the car, suggesting tears, but she was also chatting to her lady-in-waiting, suggesting she was gathering some comfort from the company.

"There was one moment when she paused and turned around before entering the chapel and it looked terribly poignant, almost as though she couldn't face going in alone.

"She turned for what looked like reassurance that her party was behind her."

During the service, the Queen followed the current social distancing rules and sat alone ahead of other members of the Royal Family.

The Queen during Prince Philip's funeral
The Queen kept her head low during the service, meaning her face was obstructed from view

She was seen wearing a symbolic, romantic Richmond brooch to honour her late husband.

Judi added: "The Queen provided the most memorable moments, in her isolation in the chapel where she sat with her head dipped so low that her face was completely covered from view by her hat."

Prince Harry sat on the other end of the same bench with the Queen, while his brother Prince William and wife Kate Middleton sat opposite in the chapel.