Jessica Toole owns Jes Rose, a company that prints colourful and patterned sticky-backed vinyl coverings for furniture.

Most recently, Jes used her own product to completely change the kitchen in her rented apartment, giving the impression of new cabinets for only £156.

Internet trolls called Jes an 'entitled millennial' and said that her kitchen looked better before its forest green and dalmatian-print transformation.

The sticky back vinyl cost £22

She posted a picture of the vinyl on her Instagram account, where it has been quickly celebrated by her 20,000 followers.

The vinyl, printed in abusive comments, will cover a bin

"But then people started sending me screenshots of what people were saying. Most of it was coming on the Daily Mail article, which didn't surprise me.

 

"My boyfriend kept telling me to just ignore it, not to respond to it, but why should I just take it and sit on it? Trolling is such a big problem at the minute, it's not okay.

"Like a few were saying 'I'm glad I'm not her landlord' and calling me an entitled millennial because I hadn't asked my landlord for permission, but the whole point of my business is that the vinyl doesn't leave any damage, it's removable!

DIY lover Jessica Toole has given her kitchen a budget makeover and people love it

"They were the only ones that got to me because I thought it could actually damage my business."

Jes Rose was created earlier this year when Jes wanted to liven up her rented Northern Quarter apartment without losing any of her deposit.

The vinyl coverings - which are available in mock-tile effect, botanical prints, colour block, animal print and art-deco designs - peel off furniture without damaging what's underneath.

Jes said of the cyber-bullying: "Oh, one person actually said I had s*** eyebrows! That hurt.

 

"I didn't respond to anyone but him - like do you really get kicks out of bullying young girls on the internet? He had kids with him in his profile picture.

"Is that what he wants to teach them? It's just so not okay."

"The interiors community is so supportive," she said.

"I must have had about 250 messages from people backing me up when the trolling started, telling me to ignore it and that none of it's true.

"Someone on Instagram actually gave me the idea, said I should print it on vinyl, so I got my designer straight on to it and had it printed the next day.

"I'm going to cover a bin with it as soon as I can find a bin big enough!"

It's a similar approach to that taken by beer company BrewDog, which prints negative reviews onto t-shirts to be worn by its staff.