logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
star Bookmark: Tag Tag Tag Tag Tag
Great Britain

Letters - September 16, 2019

Should Blue Badges contain the person's photograph?
Should Blue Badges contain the person's photograph?

Blue Badge holders should display photo

I think there is merit in the Blue Badge scheme being extended to certain people whose disablement is not one of mobility.

However, where those people are seen to be nimble on their feet, it is bound to add to the perception that disabled parking spaces are being abused.

This exists already as some people, for their convenience, use Blue Badges as a sort of ‘family proxy’ when the holder is not present.

There is also a misconception about what Blue Badges are for.

A few weeks ago, I had a perfectly nice conversation with a perfectly nice lady about her good fortune at securing the nearest disabled bay to the supermarket entry while I battled my rollator from many spaces further down the line.

She went on to explain that she did the shopping whilst her mother (obviously the badge holder) just came to ‘people watch’.

In retrospect, I wish I had remonstrated with her that ‘people watching’ is no reason to occupy a disabled space.

In any case, when there is no intention of the badge holder leaving the vehicle, there is no justification for occupying a disabled bay.

For some time now, I have thought that if there is to be any monitoring of the use of Blue Badges - whether by parking attendant or peer pressure - the holder’s photograph (but not of course, the name and address details etc) should appear on the upper (displayed) side of the badge, not the concealed underside, so that one could compare it with the person leaving the vehicle.

The planned extension of this scheme to those whose disability still leaves them nimble adds to the case for this change of documentation.

Neil Inkley

Address supplied

Brexit

‘Things to do’ omissions

It seems that there are some serious omissions from the Government’s ‘things to do’ list in the event of a no deal Brexit.

These include:

(1) Secure the services of a financial adviser because soon you will have more money than you know what to do with.

(2) Put your house on the market in the expectation of moving into a mansion with a country estate.

(3) Arrange an appointment with your local luxury car dealer so you can test drive a few of the top models and make your order before the rush starts.

No doubt these omissions will be dealt with shortly, along with “Abandon all hope”.

John Prance

Address supplied

Brexit

Bring Brexit to end soon

I think we can all agree the time to bring an end to Brexit is well overdue.

There are so many other issues to resolve, such as social care.

A no-deal will wreak untold damage on all our economies, hence the unprecedented vote against it in Parliament.

Substitute trade deals take years of wrangle to achieve.

Other proposed deals all require at least two years to negotiate, probably a whole lot more – acceptance to EFTA/EEC is not a given alternative.

The good news is we already have the best deal, so why abort it when it has served us well? No need for more years of tortuous negotiation.

A new referendum, now we have the full implications of Brexit, will enable voters to make a fresh choice among options to leave or remain, irrespective of earlier votes.

The electorate for a new referendum should include those of 16-plus years, as in Scotland. Their future is most at stake.

This is the only way to bring an early end to Brexit.

Let’s bring an end to Brexit soon.

Andrew MacDonald

Address supplied

Brexit

Yes, we have no bananas

Some people consider the suggestion that the United Kingdom is exhibiting features one normally associates with a ‘banana republic’ to be ridiculous exaggeration – that it’s hyperbole of the first order.

For the record, here are the features of a banana republic: a chronic structural trade gap; a reliance on inward foreign capital, weakening national currency; inadequate and poorly maintained national infrastructure; massive wealth inequality; a political system captured by small, wealthy-elite; and rulers immune to the deprivations they impose on ordinary citizens.

A new feature to add to the list relating to the UK arises from newspaper reports that some senior national politicians may not abide by the law of the land.

There is, of course, one major difference – the United Kingdom will be a ‘banana republic’ without bananas.

Kevin Hey

Address supplied

Themes
ICO