Fans were full of praise for Ian Wright on Thursday evening after tuning into his BBC documentary about the abuse he suffered as a child.

Ian Wright: Home Truths saw the former footballer open up about the domestic violence he witnessed when he was a kid, and how it has affected him as an adult.

The 57-year-old star visited his childhood home and was clearly emotional as old memories came flooding back regarding his mum and his stepdad.

The former Arsenal player also admitted that his own mother would beat him and even told him that she wished she had terminated him.

Fans were full of praise for Ian Wright on Thursday evening after tuning into his BBC documentary
Fans were full of praise for Ian Wright on Thursday evening after tuning into his BBC documentary

A particular tender moment came when Ian met up in a park with his brother Morris and asked him why he would put his hands over his ears when Ian was little.

Viewers found the documentary difficult to watch, but also felt that it was very important viewing.

Talking to Twitter, one person wrote: "#IanWrightHomeTruths Already heartbreaking. Brave thing to do and I’m sure will eventually help lots of people that have been through similar childhoods. @IanWright0."

Ian Wright: Home Truths saw the former footballer speak to other adults who had witnessed violence as a child
Ian Wright: Home Truths saw the former footballer speak to other adults who had witnessed violence as a child

A second posted: "Wow! @IanWright0 so moving and emotional #IanWrightHomeTruths."

A third person added: "Watching this powerful documentary of @IanWright0 on the effect of domestic abuse on children, it's harrowing, powerful and needed. #IanWrightHomeTruths."

And a fourth viewer tweeted: "Goodness this is so heavy but so important, thank you Ian #IanWrightHomeTruths."

Later on in the documentary, Ian visited a support group where he spoke to other adults who had experienced domestic violence in heir childhoods.

Ian spoke openly about his own experience of his stepdad beating his mum Nesta
Ian spoke openly about his own experience of his stepdad beating his mum Nesta

He also met with a man who was getting treatment for being violent against his own partner but desperately wanted to change.

Ian said he decided to make the documentary because he wanted to understand why the abuse has had such a lasting effect on him as an adult.

As part of the process, Ian spoke to a psychiatrist who explained that what he suffered would be considered "severe emotional abuse".

Dr Nuria Gene-Cos, a consultant psychiatrist and trauma specialist for adults at Morsley Hospital in south London, told Ian that it's the worst betrayal as parents are expected to give unconditional love.

Ian said he decided to make the documentary because he wanted to understand why the abuse has had such a lasting effect on him as an adult
Ian said he decided to make the documentary because he wanted to understand why the abuse has had such a lasting effect on him as an adult

"What I've taken from it more than anything else is what my mum went through and the fact she was a victim of the circumstances she was in," he explained.

"It's a lot easier for me to think about and deal with than before. I've realised I can forgive. I have to find it in myself as I have to move on for my own kids and make sure they're okay."

Ian Wright: Home Truths is available to watch on BBC iPlayer.