New Zealand's Laurel Hubbard becomes the first transgender person to compete at the Olympic Games in a gender category different to that which they were born.

The 43-year-old transitioned from male to female in 2012 and will represent the Kiwis in the women’s weightlifting.

Her selection has caused upset among some who have claimed Hubbard’s place in the games has cost others amid several voices claiming she might have an unfair advantage because she went through male puberty before her transition in 2012.

While Hubbard has won support from supporters of trans rights and several athletes and ex-athletes, others have criticised the decision to allow her to compete.

Belgian weightlifter Anna Vanbellinghen said that, while she fully supported the transgender community, she didn’t think it was fair for Hubbard to compete in the women’s 84kg+ category.

She said: "Anyone that has trained weightlifting at a high level knows this to be true in their bones: this particular situation is unfair to the sport and to the athletes.”

But Hubbard has done absolutely nothing wrong and her participation does not break any rules.

In 2015, the International Olympic Committee announced that those that have transitioned from male to female can compete in women's sport – without requiring surgery – if they have remained female for at least four years and kept testosterone levels below 10 nanomoles per litre for at least 12 months.

Hubbard qualifies having met international weightlifting rules which follow the 2015 guidelines that dictate she only needs enough medication to lower her testosterone to below 10 nmol/l. However, sporting federations are allowed to set their own tighter guidelines.

World Athletics has set five nmol/lp as its benchmark, and the International Weightlifting Federation is expected to adopt the same levels once an ongoing IOC study is completed. The IOC has delayed updating its 2015 guidelines because finding a consensus has proved so difficult.

After her selection, Hubbard released a statement that read: “I am grateful and humbled by the kindness and support that has been given to me by so many New Zealanders.”

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While competing as a youth, Hubbard had been the national boys' record holder but she eventually quit the sport in 2001 at the age of 23.

She transitioned in 2012, saying: "It just became too much to bear, the pressure of trying to fit into a world that perhaps wasn't really set up for people like myself."

In 2015, the International Olympic Committee announced that those that have transitioned from male to female can compete in women's sport – without requiring surgery – if they have remained female for at least four years and kept testosterone levels below 10 nanomoles per litre for at least 12 months.

Hubbard qualifies having met international weightlifting rules which follow the 2015 guidelines that dictate she only needs enough medication to lower her testosterone to below 10 nmol/l. However, sporting federations are allowed to set their own tighter guidelines.

World Athletics has set five nmol/lp as its benchmark, and the International Weightlifting Federation is expected to adopt the same levels once an ongoing IOC study is completed. The IOC has delayed updating its 2015 guidelines because finding a consensus has proved so difficult.

There are people who argue the drugs that are widely used by transgender women as they transition do not entirely offset the physical benefits of having gone through male puberty. In truth, there simply is not enough specific research.

However, Joanna Harper, who studies transgender athletes at Loughborough University, told the New York Times that transgender women rarely have an overwhelming advantage.

“It’s an affront to many people that she’s simply participating,” Harper said. “It’s clear she’s going to do well. After all, she’s made it to the Olympics. But she’s not going to dominate the sport.”