Great Britain

Green list countries LATEST – Travel announcement TODAY will reveal where Brits can go on holiday without quarantine

LET US GO!
- Will Greece be on the green list?
- Is Spain going to be on the green list?
- Will Portugal be on the green list?
- All the countries that could go on the green list

AN ANNOUNCEMENT on what countries Brits can visit on holiday without quarantining is expected later today.

The Government has not released an official time for the announcement, there will likely be a Downing Street press conference this afternoon.

While just a "handful" of countries are due to get the coveted green status from May 17 when the list is annoince, a three-weekly review will pave the way for more places to be added.

Popular destinations including Spain, Greece and France are pencilled in by Downing Street to be added by the end of June, reports the Telegraph.

A government source said the list will be updated every few weeks to give Brits the chance to get away.

But travel industry leaders have slammed the “cautious” approach.

In a joint article in The Daily Telegraph, leaders of British Airways, easyJet, Jet2, Heathrow Airport and the Manchester Airport Group took aim at the British government’s “overabundance of caution”.

The industry chiefs said that while they wanted to support a “safe reopening...if we are not prepared to accept any risk then travel will never restart and we will not be able to support UK travel and tourism businesses and supercharge the UK’s economic recovery.”

Read our coronavirus live blog below for the latest updates...

  • AIR FARES TO PORTUGAL SOAR AHEAD OF GREEN LIST ANNOUNCEMENT

    British Airways is charging £530 for a flight from Heathrow to the Algarve on May 17, which is when the ban on foreign holidays will be lifted for people in England.

    Flying the same route two days earlier costs just £234.

    A Ryanair flight from Stansted to Portugal’s capital Lisbon on the day overseas leisure travel restarts is £152, compared with £15 on May 16.

    EasyJet is charging £234 for a flight from Luton to the Algarve on May 17, but just £73 the following day.

  • MOST COMMON SIDE EFFECTS OF COVID VACCINE REVEALED

    Headache and fatigue have been revealed as the most common side effects of the Covid vaccines used in the UK.

    Data from one million people show for each of the AstraZeneca, Pfizer or Moderna jabs, the symptoms in the following days differ slightly.

    A descending list of the most frequently reported problems was compiled by Professor Tim Spector, an epidemiologist at King’s College London (KCL).

    Prof Spector is the lead researcher on the ZOE Covid study, which tracks symptoms of the disease, vaccines and the size of the outbreak.

    Using data for app users, Prof Spector said most people reported a headache after the AstraZeneca jab, followed by fatigue.

  • ADVICE ON WHEN TO SEEK HELP AFTER THE ASTRAZENECA VACCINE

    The UK's medicine regulator, the MHRA, says you should seek medical advice if you have had any of these symptoms four days or more after vaccination with the AstraZeneca vaccine:

  • UNDER-40S ‘WILL NOW BE OFFERED ALTERNATIVE VACCINE’ INSTEAD OF ASTRAZENECA JAB OVER BLOOD CLOT FEARS

    PEOPLE under 40 will be offered an alternative to the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab over blood clot fears, it was reported tonight.

    The Joint Committee of Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), a panel of experts which advises the government, is set to announce the guidance on Friday.

    It is said to have made the decision out of “an abundance of caution” because rates of Covid are so low in the UK. The UK-made jab carries a “vanishingly small” risk of causing serious brain clots - around seven in a million.

    Experts say the risk is massively outweighed by the jab’s benefits for most people, but for the young and healthy the balance is harder to judge.

    The JCVI has already recommended that people younger than 30 are offered the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines instead.


  • CHRIS WHITTY: PANDEMIC OUTLOOK REMAINS 'PRETTY BLEAK'

    Covid-19 is unlikely ever to be eradicated and the outlook for the pandemic remains "pretty bleak" in the medium term, leading Government scientists have said.

    England's chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty said the world will continue to see a "significant" number of deaths unless more effort is made to vaccinate the vulnerable globally.

    And he warned that while coronavirus may become a "much milder, chronic disease" in the long term, new variants will continue to cause problems.

    Speaking at a Royal Society online event about Covid-19 on Thursday, Prof Whitty said: "In the medium term, the outlook still looks pretty bleak around the world.

    "I would really reiterate that until we have got a situation where we have induced immunity in those who are most vulnerable everywhere in the world, we will continue to see really significant morbidity and mortality from this virus."

  • INDIAN COVID-19 STRAIN LIKELY TO BE DECLARED VARIANT OF CONCERN

    A coronavirus strain first detected in India is likely to be elevated to a "variant of concern" after clusters were found in several areas of England, according to reports.

    Cases of the variant have been found in schools, care homes and places of worship in the North West, London and the East Midlands, largely linked to travel, Channel 4 News has reported.

    The broadcaster said it is "highly likely" it will be declared a "variant of concern" on Friday, though cases remain relatively low.

    Such a change can mean an escalation in response from Public Health England (PHE), including ordering surge testing.

    The strain - B1617.2 - is one of three related variants first seen in India which have been detected in the UK and designated "under investigation" by PHE.

    The others are B1617.1 and B1617.3.

  • US ADMINISTERS NEARLY 252 MILLION DOSES OF COVID-19 VACCINES

    The United States has administered 251,973,752 doses of COVID-19 vaccines as of Thursday morning and distributed 324,610,185 doses, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Thursday.

    Those figures are up from the 249,566,820 vaccine doses the CDC said had gone into arms by Wednesday out of 321,549,335 doses delivered.

    The agency said 149,462,265 people had received at least one dose while 108,926,627 people are fully vaccinated as of Thursday.

  • AIRLINE TICKETS HIKE AHEAD OF TRAVEL LIST ANNOUNCEMENT

    Airlines increase prices in line with demand, indicating that many holidaymakers are hoping Portugal is categorised as a low-risk destination for coronavirus.

    Around 2.5 million British nationals visited the country in 2019.

    The quarantine and testing requirements for people arriving in England once foreign holidays resume will be based on a new traffic light system, with destinations placed on green, amber and red lists.

    People arriving from a green location will not need to quarantine and will only have to take one post-arrival test.

    Those returning from an amber list country must self-isolate for at least five days and take two tests. The red list requires a 10-night stay in a quarantine hotel at a cost of £1,750 for solo travellers.

  • AIR FARES TO PORTUGAL SOAR AHEAD OF GREEN LIST ANNOUNCEMENT

    British Airways is charging £530 for a flight from Heathrow to the Algarve on May 17, which is when the ban on foreign holidays will be lifted for people in England.

    Flying the same route two days earlier costs just £234.

    A Ryanair flight from Stansted to Portugal's capital Lisbon on the day overseas leisure travel restarts is £152, compared with £15 on May 16.

    EasyJet is charging £234 for a flight from Luton to the Algarve on May 17, but just £73 the following day.

  • ASTRAZENECA COVID-19 VACCINE TO ALL ADULTS

    Germany will allow AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine to be given to adults of all ages, reversing a previous decision that restricted it to people who are over 60 years old, Health Minister Jens Spahn said on Thursday.

    Spahn also said Germany aimed to offer 12-18 year olds a vaccine by the end of August, provided regulators give approval for the BioNTech/Pfizer shot for that age group

  • MOST COMMON SIDE EFFECTS OF COVID VACCINE REVEALED

    Headache and fatigue have been revealed as the most common side effects of the Covid vaccines used in the UK.

    Data from one million people show for each of the AstraZeneca, Pfizer or Moderna jabs, the symptoms in the following days differ slightly.

    A descending list of the most frequently reported problems was compiled by Professor Tim Spector, an epidemiologist at King’s College London (KCL).

    Prof Spector is the lead researcher on the ZOE Covid study, which tracks symptoms of the disease, vaccines and the size of the outbreak.

    Using data for app users, Prof Spector said most people reported a headache after the AstraZeneca jab, followed by fatigue.

  • NO HINT THAT COVID VARIANTS CAN FULLY EVADE VACCINES

    Health experts “haven’t seen any hint” at the moment of a Covid variant that can fully evade the effectiveness of vaccines, a leading scientist has said.

    Sharon Peacock, head of the Covid-19 Genomics UK Consortium (COG-UK) and professor of public health and microbiology at the University of Cambridge, said it could be the case that coronavirus mutates to become less infectious.

    Despite this, she warned it could take years for it to become like the common cold.

    Asked whether a variant will emerge somewhere across the globe that is resistant to current vaccines, Prof Peacock told Times Radio: “That’s what we’d call it, a variant of major concern.

    “We haven’t seen anything like that to date, and the question you’re asking is the million dollar question in many ways, everybody wants to know what’s the likelihood and when is it likely to occur, if at all.”

  • NORTHERN IRELAND: SEVEN CASES OF INDIAN VARIANT DETECTED

    Seven confirmed cases of the Indian variant of Covid-19 have been detected in Northern Ireland, the Department of Health has said.

    They are the first confirmed cases of the variant in the region.

    Chief medical officer Dr Michael McBride said a detailed health protection risk assessment would be carried out along with contact tracing.

    “This news is not entirely unexpected and plans are in place for such an eventuality,” he said.

    “While preventative measures – including travel restrictions – are very important, the assessment is that these will delay rather than permanently prevent the spread of variants already detected elsewhere on these islands.”

  • WATCH: FAMILY MEMBERS FIND INDIAN HOSPITAL FULL OF DEAD COVID PATIENTS – THAT STAFF ALLEGEDLY HID FROM THEM

    Family members find Indian hospital full of DEAD COVID PATIENTS – that staff allegedly HID FROM THEM
  • FURLOUGH CLAIMS FELL IN MARCH AS ECONOMY PREPARES TO REOPEN

    Fewer people were furloughed on Government support in the UK in March, as shuttered businesses across the country prepared to open their doors.

    Provisional figures show 14% of eligible people in the UK were furloughed on March 31, compared to 16% a month earlier.

    It marks the last set of data before pubs and non-essential shops were allowed to open for the first time in months.

    In April, thousands of businesses across the UK that had been closed since the start of the year welcomed back customers and staff.

    The latest figures do not include this period.

  • NO HINT THAT COVID VARIANTS CAN FULLY EVADE VACCINES (CONTINUED...)

    "Now, some people have predicted that a virus could emerge that is pretty resistant to vaccines, but we haven't seen any hint of that at the moment.

    "And the idea that this could arise is based on models from previous viruses, not this current one, so at the moment, I remain optimistic that we're in a good place - that the viruses that are circulating are susceptible to vaccinations.

    "And the key thing is to get on and vaccinate the world so that we can clamp down [on] disease. If we can reduce disease rates, then we reduce the risk of variants arising in the first place."

    Prof Peacock said work was ongoing to look at the variant first identified in India, including whether it could spread in the UK compared to the Kent variant.

    The Indian government has said the coronavirus variant first discovered there in March may be linked to its deadly second wave.

  • NO HINT THAT COVID VARIANTS CAN FULLY EVADE VACCINES, SAYS SCIENTIST

    Health experts "haven't seen any hint" at the moment of a Covid variant that can fully evade the effectiveness of vaccines, a leading scientist has said.

    Sharon Peacock, head of the Covid-19 Genomics UK Consortium (COG-UK) and professor of public health and microbiology at the University of Cambridge, said it could be the case that coronavirus mutates to become less infectious, though she warned it could take years for it to become like the common cold.

    Asked whether a variant will emerge somewhere across the globe that is resistant to current vaccines, Prof Peacock told Times Radio: "That's what we'd call it, a variant of major concern. We haven't seen anything like that to date, and the question you're asking is the million dollar question in many ways, everybody wants to know what's the likelihood and when is it likely to occur, if at all.

    "What we don't know is if it is likely to occur. We know that as mutations accumulate in the virus, it can actually make it more fit in terms of avoiding our immune system, but the more mutations it accumulates, it could actually lead to a virus that is less infectious, for example.

    "So there's a trade-off for the virus in terms of how many mutations it can tolerate."

  • IRELAND: NON-ESSENTIAL CROSS-BORDER TRAVEL MUST BE STOPPED 'BY ENFORCEMENT IF REQUIRED'

    Non-essential cross-border travel must be stopped "by enforcement if required", Northern Ireland's Health Minister has warned.

    In a letter to Stephen Donnelly, his counterpart in the Republic, Robin Swann warned of a spike in Covid-19 cases in border counties.

    The lifting of pandemic restrictions and the vaccination programme in Northern Ireland has outpaced those in the Republic, raising fresh concerns over cross-border travel.

    In a letter to Mr Donnelly on Wednesday, seen by the PA news agency, Mr Swann warned of a "fresh increase of community transmission of Covid-19".

    He said that governments in both jurisdiction should do everything possible to prevent non-essential cross-border travel.

  • MOST COMMON SIDE EFFECTS OF COVID VACCINE REVEALED

    Headache and fatigue have been revealed as the most common side effects of the Covid vaccines used in the UK.

    Data from one million people show for each of the AstraZeneca, Pfizer or Moderna jabs, the symptoms in the following days differ slightly.

    A descending list of the most frequently reported problems was compiled by Professor Tim Spector, an epidemiologist at King’s College London (KCL).

    Prof Spector is the lead researcher on the ZOE Covid study, which tracks symptoms of the disease, vaccines and the size of the outbreak.

    Using data for app users, Prof Spector said most people reported a headache after the AstraZeneca jab, followed by fatigue.

  • NO HINT THAT COVID VARIANTS CAN FULLY EVADE VACCINES

    Health experts “haven’t seen any hint” at the moment of a Covid variant that can fully evade the effectiveness of vaccines, a leading scientist has said.

    Sharon Peacock, head of the Covid-19 Genomics UK Consortium (COG-UK) and professor of public health and microbiology at the University of Cambridge, said it could be the case that coronavirus mutates to become less infectious.

    Despite this, she warned it could take years for it to become like the common cold.

    Asked whether a variant will emerge somewhere across the globe that is resistant to current vaccines, Prof Peacock told Times Radio: “That’s what we’d call it, a variant of major concern.

    “We haven’t seen anything like that to date, and the question you’re asking is the million dollar question in many ways, everybody wants to know what’s the likelihood and when is it likely to occur, if at all.”

  • NORTHERN IRELAND: SEVEN CASES OF INDIAN VARIANT DETECTED

    Seven confirmed cases of the Indian variant of Covid-19 have been detected in Northern Ireland, the Department of Health has said.

    They are the first confirmed cases of the variant in the region.

    Chief medical officer Dr Michael McBride said a detailed health protection risk assessment would be carried out along with contact tracing.

    “This news is not entirely unexpected and plans are in place for such an eventuality,” he said.

    “While preventative measures – including travel restrictions – are very important, the assessment is that these will delay rather than permanently prevent the spread of variants already detected elsewhere on these islands.”

  • REVEALED: YOUR CHANCES OF GETTING COVID BY PROFESSOR TIM SPECTOR

    Your odds of getting Covid tomorrow revealed by Prof Tim Spector

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