A rare full moon, known as a "micro moon" will coincide with another rare event this week: Friday 13th

Our satellite will be at the furthest point in its orbit around the Earth. As a result, the moon will appear both smaller and dimmer in the night sky when viewed from Earth.

Compared to a "super moon" - when a full moon coincides with its closest point in its orbit of Earth - the micro moon will appear 14 per cent smaller and 30 per cent dimmer.

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It is the first time in 13 years that a full moon has appeared on Friday the 13th, and it won't happen again until May 2033 - in 13 years time.

For anyone hoping to see it, its peak will vary depending on what part of the world stargazers are in.

In the UK, the moon will be at its peak fullness at precisely 5.32am on Saturday morning, but will appear full in the sky throughout Friday night. 

Anyone on the east coast of the US will see the Moon rise at 7.31pm and reach its peak illumination at around midnight. Those on the west coast will see it peak at around 9.32pm.

The Met Office said skies over the UK will be relatively clear on Friday night, making it a perfect opportunity for star gazers to catch a glimpse of it. 

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