‘Extreme and unrealistic’ was one of the assessments made today by fact-checkers after Labour’s manifesto launch.

Full Fact, the independent charity which tackles bad information in public life, has scrutinised the manifesto after it was launched by Jeremy Corbyn in Birmingham today.

The Labour leader vowed to re-nationalise mail, rail, water and energy and make broadband free for all homes and businesses by 2030.

Mr Corbyn said the party would scrap tuition fees and Universal Credit and put more money into the NHS and an extensive housing plan that includes building 150,000 new council homes.

Here’s what Full Fact think of the leader’s ambitious plans.

On the future of the NHS and the US

Jeremy Corbyn said: ‘Mr Johnson is preparing to sell out our National Health Service for a United States trade deal that will drive up the cost of medicines.

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‘£500 million a week of NHS money could be handed to big drugs companies.’

The fact checkers say: This figure is extreme and unrealistic.

It has not been the case in countries which have agreed trade deals with the USA, such as Australia.

This claim is based on a scenario where UK drug prices more than double to match those in the USA.

Health experts at the Nuffield Trust have said that ‘represents a fairly extreme scenario, although it illustrates a genuine concern’.

Published US negotiating objectives for a UK-US trade deal make clear that the US aims to improve the access that US pharmaceutical companies have in the UK.

It is possible that this will have some impact on drug prices.

But Labour’s claim depends on a UK government being willing to accept a deal which would increase the costs of the NHS by £27 billion a year.

That’s 19% of all public spending on health.

On Brexit

Jeremy Corbyn said: Boris Johnson’s claim that he will get Brexit done is ‘a fraud on the British people’.

The fact checkers say: The UK will stop being a member of the EU if Boris Johnson’s deal goes through.

Negotiations with the EU on a future trade deal will then take place during a transition period, during which time the UK will still follow EU rules and pay money into the EU budget.

All sides agree that they want to have a trade deal with the EU. Based on past deals this may take years to negotiate.

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‘Getting Brexit done’ is a process, not an event.

It is not fraudulent to claim that the UK leaving the EU amounts to getting Brexit done but Jeremy Corbyn is right to point out that the Brexit process will continue for many years.

On tax

Jeremy Corbyn said: Labour’s manifesto was costed with ‘no increases in VAT, income tax or National Insurance for people earning less than £80,000’.

He added: ‘That’s no tax increases for 95% of taxpayers’.

The fact checkers say: It’s correct that people earning less than £80,000 account for around 95% of taxpayers.

But it’s not true that Labour plans no tax rises whatsoever for the 95%, because there’s more to tax than just VAT, income tax and National Insurance.

For example, Labour’s manifesto commits to scrapping marriage allowance.

In 2018/19, 1.78 million people claimed marriage allowance, at a cost of £485 million.

Other taxes that could affect people with salaries under £80,000 include inheritance tax and corporation tax, both of which stand to rise under Labour’s manifesto.

Full Fact said its automated fact checking tools have identified 2,299 claims in Labour’s full manifesto.

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It says it will continue to check and verify these over the coming days on its website.

Will Moy, Chief Executive of Full Fact, said: ‘In just three weeks’ time, voters will make a decision that will affect their lives and communities.

‘We all deserve information that is accurate and honest, which is why we and others must fully scrutinise the promises made by our politicians.

‘Candidates and parties are asking voters for their trust for the next five years, and like the other main parties, Labour can do more to meet the standards we expect.

‘Over the next few days we’ll be working with experts to scrutinise today’s claims in depth.’